There’s no getting around it. This holiday season is going to be …. weird. With the coronavirus pandemic still hanging around, there will likely be fewer large family gatherings, and festivities will be toned down.

But even if you can’t be with your family, there’s still one thing we can all do to try and make the holidays feel like the holidays: Cook.

Cook the recipes that have become a staple in your family’s holiday lineup. The ones that conjure up memories of Thanksgivings, Hanukkahs, Kwanzaas and Christmases past because the very smell of that dish coming out of the oven makes you think of your mom. (Because she’s been making that recipe ever since it was passed down from her mom. Who got it from her mom.)

Food is woven tightly into our social fabric and has a unique way of connecting people across generations and cultures. So we’re betting your family has a dish like that — one that evokes a fond holiday memory, like a bookmark in time.

If you’re willing to help spread a little bit of that love this tough holiday season, we’re on the hunt for these very special generational family recipes.

We want to hear about that special gyoza recipe your dad has been making for Christmas for decades. Or the cranberry relish with that super secret ingredient you had to beg your aunt to share. Or the tamales your grandmother painstakingly taught you to make in grade school.

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We want to know what these intergenerational family recipes mean to you and your family, and why you eat them over the holidays (and, which holiday). And also, if you’re willing to share, we’d love to have the recipe to share with others.

So if you’d like to participate in our project, by Oct. 12, fill out the form below or email features producer Amy Wong at awong@seattletimes.com, and one of our writers may follow up with you.

We’ll pick several of the best submissions and compile them for a holiday feature that we hope will inspire everyone, and give folks new ideas of dishes to add to their holiday lineup to replace ones that might not be there this year.

Maybe you’ll help someone missing the hustle and bustle of a crowded house make a new memory this holiday season.