The good news? You can easily solve this problem with self-discipline and proper planning.

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Q: Our human resources director recently informed me that my bosses were concerned about my coming in late. As an administrative assistant, I report to two different managers who have never mentioned this issue.

After I sent an apologetic email, both my bosses said it wasn’t a big deal and that the complaint was based on the HR director’s own observations. If my being late doesn’t bother them, I don’t see why it’s any of her business. What’s your opinion?

A: While your HR director may have slightly shaded the facts, her department is responsible for seeing that policies are applied consistently. So it doesn’t really matter where this complaint originated.

If your workplace has a standard start time, these early morning absences may create problems for other people. Colleagues might have to answer your phone, for example, or be unable to find you when they need something. Those who make the effort to arrive on time could view tolerance of your tardiness as favoritism.

It’s quite possible, therefore, that this issue was raised by your punctual co-workers. And it’s also possible that your managers aren’t as indifferent as you think. The good news, however, is that you can easily solve this problem with self-discipline and proper planning.