If the tickets are supposed to be a general employee benefit, then everyone should have an equal shot at winning.

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Q: Each year, our company buys a season ticket package for our hometown NFL team. These seats are excellent and extremely costly. Since we are a very small business, every employee can attend one game at company expense. Some games are more desirable than others, so we have a drawing to distribute the tickets.

Because our business is growing, next season we will have more employees than games. Two of our new hires are already season ticket subscribers, so if they win company tickets, they plan to use them and sell the others.

Without company tickets, some long-term employees won’t be able to attend any games at all. They feel that season ticket holders should not be allowed to participate in the drawing. What’s your opinion?

A: If these tickets are supposed to be a general employee benefit, then everyone should have an equal shot at winning. Despite having their own tickets, your new employees may still want an opportunity to use the “excellent and costly” company seats. If not, they can voluntarily remove their names from the drawing.

As your company continues to grow, you will inevitably have an increasingly smaller percentage of winners and a larger percentage of losers. So perhaps you should consider replacing the NFL experience with a more inclusive gesture. Many things that work well in a very small company are not effective in a larger enterprise.

Submit questions to Marie G. McIntyre at yourofficecoach.com.