If you thought it was tough to keep up with series programming in 2019 following the debuts of Disney+ and Apple TV+, media corporations are poised to make 2020 an even more challenging year for viewers who wish to stay on top of what’s buzzy in pop culture.

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Here are the shows and services from TV Land to most look forward to in 2020:

New series

Familiar titles abound, from ABC’s prime-time “Jeopardy! The Greatest of All Time” (8 p.m. Jan. 7, 8 and 9, featuring Seattle’s own Ken Jennings, along with James Holzhauer and Brad Rutter) to “Star Trek: Picard” (Jan. 23, CBS All Access), featuring Patrick Stewart reprising his role as Capt. Jean-Luc Picard.

Patrick Stewart, left, as Picard and Jonathan Frakes as Riker in “Star Trek: Picard,” debuting on CBS All Access Jan. 23. (Trae Patton / CBS)
Patrick Stewart, left, as Picard and Jonathan Frakes as Riker in “Star Trek: Picard,” debuting on CBS All Access Jan. 23. (Trae Patton / CBS)

Long-gestating Joe Hill graphic novel-turned-series “Locke and Key” (Feb. 7, Netflix), about a family moving into their magical ancestral home, finally sees the light of day.

Freeform remakes the 1994-2000 Fox drama “Party of Five” (9 p.m. Jan. 8), this time about a family separated at America’s southern border with the kids living on their own in America.

Hulu adapts the 2017 Celeste Ng bestseller “Little Fires Everywhere (March 18) starring Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington.

Kerry Washington and Reese Witherspoon star in Hulu’s “Little Fires Everywhere.”  (Courtesy of Hulu)
Kerry Washington and Reese Witherspoon star in Hulu’s “Little Fires Everywhere.” (Courtesy of Hulu)

Established stars in new roles include Edie Falco (“The Sopranos,” “Nurse Jackie”) heading up CBS’s “Tommy” (10 p.m. Feb. 6) as an NYPD officer who become the first female chief of police in Los Angeles.

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RuPaul (“RuPaul’s Drag Race”) stars in Netflix’s “AJ and the Queen” (Jan. 10) as a down-on-her-luck drag queen who traverses America with an 11-year-old stowaway.

Awkwafina is Nora from Queens” (10:30 p.m. Jan. 22, Comedy Central) features the “Crazy Rich Asians” breakout star in a half-hour scripted comedy inspired by her real life being raised by her dad (played by BD Wong) and grandma (Lori Tan Chinn).

For off-the-wall, high-concept programming, check out “Veep” creator Armando Iannucci’s “Avenue 5” (10 p.m. Jan. 19, HBO), starring Hugh Laurie (“House”) as a space-cruise-ship captain.

Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist” (previews 10 p.m. Jan. 7 on NBC before rolling out weekly at 9 p.m. Feb. 16) focuses on a computer coder (Jane Levy, “Suburgatory”) who hears the thoughts of those around her as songs.

Teams of two compete against each other in brick-building challenges on Fox reality competition “Lego Masters” (9 p.m. Feb. 5).

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PBS’s “Masterpiece” debuts an adaptation of Jane Austen’s final, unfinished work, “Sanditon” (9 p.m. Jan. 12) and new World War II drama “World on Fire” (9 p.m. April 5).

Returning series

Aidy Bryant stars in the Hulu comedy “Shrill,” based on the memoir of the same title by Seattle author Lindy West. Season 2 starts Jan. 24. (Allyson Riggs / Hulu)
Aidy Bryant stars in the Hulu comedy “Shrill,” based on the memoir of the same title by Seattle author Lindy West. Season 2 starts Jan. 24. (Allyson Riggs / Hulu)

Seattle writer Lindy West’s “Shrill returns to Hulu Jan. 24 as Portland writer Annie (Aidy Bryant) deals with the repercussions of the Season 1 finale, in which she confronted her online troll.

In October, Seattle-set “Station 19 (8 p.m. Jan. 23, ABC) returned to film scenes locally for its third season, the first time the show has shot in Seattle since its 2018 pilot episode.

Grace and Frankie” (Jan. 15, Netflix), “The Magicians” (10 p.m. Jan. 15, Syfy), “Curb Your Enthusiasm” (10:30 p.m. Jan. 19, HBO), “High Maintenance” (11 p.m. Feb. 7, HBO), “Outlander” (8 p.m. Feb. 16, Starz) and “Better Call Saul” (10 p.m. Feb. 23, AMC) all return for new seasons.

Returning programs bowing out include Pop TV’s “Schitt’s Creek” (back with new episodes at 9 p.m. Jan. 7) and Showtime’s “Homeland” (returning at 9 p.m. Feb. 9). The CW’s “Arrow” wraps with a two-hour finale at 8 p.m. Jan. 28 and “Supernatural” says farewell after 15 seasons at 8 p.m. May 18.

New streaming services

When it launches in May, HBO Max will essentially replace streaming service HBO Now. Priced at $14.99 per month, it will give HBO subscribers all the HBO content they currently get, with the addition of original series, including a “Gossip Girl” reboot and an animated “Gremlins” series, “Friends” and “The West Wing” reruns and blockbuster and classic films.

Launching in April with library content (originals are slated to come later in 2020), NBC’s Peacock will be an ad-supported service that’s free to Comcast customers — a pay-subscription version for non-Comcast customers will also be available — that includes original programming, like a “Saved by the Bell” sequel series, a “Battlestar Galactica” reboot and reruns of “The Office.”

Then there’s newcomer Quibi, which bills itself as a “mobile-first” platform devoted to short-form programming, with episodes that run three-to-15 minutes. Debuting April 6, Quibi is the brainchild of DreamWorks co-founder Jeffrey Katzenberg and former Hewlett Packard CEO Meg Whitman. Announced programming for the service includes an updated “The Fugitive,” a Liam Hemsworth-starring action-thriller, a series version of the movie “Varsity Blues” and a new season of former Comedy Central show “Reno 911!”

Quibi will come in two tiers: $4.99 monthly with short ads; $7.99 without them.