The actor is headed to the stage of Seattle’s Benaroya Hall on May 3 in a show titled “Legal Immigrant.”

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Alan Cumming first got me in “Spy Kids,” a 2001 children’s movie in which he played a colorful character called Floop.

He sang, he schemed, he was conniving and evil and demanding and simply adorable, with his arched brows and mouth slightly curled at the corners.

In life, as in acting, Cumming seems a joyful sprite, a touch campy and seemingly up to no good.

The years since have seen Cumming staying ridiculously busy, hosting the Tony Awards, continuing to be conniving as political consultant and fixer Eli Gold on “The Good Wife,” appearing on Broadway in “Cabaret,” (twice!) and all the while singing sappy songs all over the place. He’s now the star of the CBS Sunday night drama “Instinct,” in which he plays a college professor/author/musical prodigy/same-sex husband who helps a New York City detective solve murders.

Cumming is headed to the stage of Seattle’s Benaroya Hall on May 3 in a show titled “Legal Immigrant” during which he will sing and patter and maybe get a touch political; One never knows with this one.

We called Cumming at his place in New York’s Greenwich Village to talk about the upcoming show, singing, immigration, television and knitting and his mother. That’s all.

What can people expect from your “Legal Immigrant” show at Benaroya?

“It’s a cabaret of different songs, very different genres of songs. A very eclectic mix. (Stephen) Sondheim. P!nk. Marlene Dietrich. A lovely Scottish song. A Disney princess mashup.

“It’s also about me. It’s been 10 years since I became an American citizen and will be talking about what it feels like to be an immigrant in this country and how that has changed. I’ll be talking about the heritage of the composers and the writers of the songs. It’s a celebration of immigrants because there are so many of them taking part in the evening. And there will be some stories about my life in America.

“Laughter, tears.”

Will you get political?

“It’s impossible not to get political when it comes to immigration. The thing I want to say and the thing that really horrified me … the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services removed the phrase ‘nation of immigrants’ from the website. That’s shocking.

“I’m a political animal. It’s impossible not to be. It’s like breathing. Every decision you make in your day is a political act.

“The country I have joined has changed so much. I wonder if I was applying to be a citizen now, if it would be so easy.

“You just have to remind yourself of the great things about this country and also the fact that a majority of people did not vote for (President Donald Trump) and have good values and all the good qualities.

“But if you elect a clown, you’re going to get a circus.”

When are you happiest? Singing in front of a crowd, or acting in front of a camera? Does it matter?

“I’m generally a happy person, but the actual connection you get with a live audience far supersedes the connection you get with the camera. I have really enjoyed getting better at being a performer in this way. It has been an incredible thing, to be that vulnerable.”

Let’s talk about “Instinct,” your new Sunday night show on CBS. I love the many facets of your character, especially that he’s gay and married and nobody cares.

“I think that’s the big breakthrough, the fact that the gayness is just a part of the character. I think that’s an important step. There are different ways you can be an activist and sometimes the small ways make the biggest splash. There are millions of people seeing a same-sex relationship portrayed on the small screen and that’s not the focus.”

You’re the executive producer of the show. How does that work in the day-to-day?

“I’m involved in all the big decisions and I get to see the scripts early and see all the cuts. I also make sure there are enough vegan options and make sure people have fun at work.

“I want people to have a good time. And I want to have a good time and have fun. We dance in between takes. The whole crew dances. If you’re the boss and you want to dance, why can’t we dance?

“It’s just a job. Let’s make it fun and do it well and not muck about. That’s my mantra for life.”

You have a bar in the East Village called Club Cumming that has theme nights. I want to come to the knitting night. Will you sit next to me and purl for a while?

“It’s called ‘Knit at Nights.’ We have different things every night and different performances. There’s a ‘Drink and Draw’ drawing class on Sundays. The knitting thing has an instructor named Josh (Bennett). There’s a line of people waiting to get into the bar on Tuesdays to have a drink and knit.

“The reason we have Josh is that a couple of years ago, I wanted to learn how to knit. He had a business called ‘Boy Meets Purl.’ And he taught me how to knit and I made a hat. It’s such a lovely thing and it’s a diverse group and that’s what the whole bar is about.”

I think I saw you wearing that hat on Instagram.

“Is it gray? Oh, you don’t want to see it from the back.”

It sounds like you’re in a lovely place in life. Acting and singing, married (to artist Grant Shaffer), knitting …

“I love having my bar and rekindling my knitting passion. Really, things are going well. I get to do lots of disparate things in my life. Lots of weird little projects. I did this animated thing, I’m going to introduce a screening of Laurence Olivier’s “Hamlet” and I can use my fame to do good things.

“My mother just had her 80th birthday and we had a big get-together. She deleted her Instagram account by mistake. Since she’s gotten it back, she’s been commenting up the wazoo.”

What’s her name? Maybe I’ll follow her.

“Mary Darling. But you can’t follow her. It’s private. She says, ‘All these people want to follow me!’ And I say, ‘Mom, that’s blah-blah’s boyfriend.’ ” Maybe I’ll put in a good word for you.