Cherry blossoms, shorn sheep, Leon Russell, and author Jennifer Teege will be part of busy entertainment week beginning Sunday, April 19.

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MOVIES

‘Ex Machina’

First-time director Alex Garland has made one of the most remarkable science-fiction movies in recent memory. It centers on an artificial-intelligence robot named Ava who poses challenging questions about what constitutes the nature of humanity. Alicia Vikander, Oscar Isaac and Domhnall Gleeson star. Now playing at several theaters. For showtimes, see Page H7. For Soren Andersen’s full 4-star review, go to seattletimes.com/movies.

‘The Hunting Ground’

Kirby Dick’s documentary about sexual assault on university campuses is important but devastating viewing. Now showing at SIFF Cinema Egyptian. For showtimes, see Page H7. For Seattle Times movie critic Moira Macdonald’s 3.5-star review, go to seattletimes.com/movies.

TV

‘The Americans’

It’s the season finale of this 1980s-set spy drama starring Matthew Rhys and Keri Russell. 10 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 22, on FX.

‘20/20’

On a special edition of the news program, Diane Sawyer interviews Bruce Jenner. 9 p.m. Friday, April 24, on ABC.

FOOD

Arcade Lights

Artisan food, craft beer and fine wine await with 70 local food and drink purveyors ready to serve. 6:30 p.m. Friday, April 24, Pike Place Market, Seattle; $60-$120 (206-682-7453 or pikeplacemarketfoundation.org).

Margarita Monday

Celebrate sunny days with a margarita or two. Check out $4 Margarita Monday at Eastlake Bar & Grill, 2947 Eastlake Ave. E. and at Greenlake Bar & Grill, 7200 E. Green Lake Drive N. (neighborhoodgrills.com).

FESTIVALS, COMMUNITY

Cherry Blossom and Japanese Cultural Festival

Explore Japanese food, taiko drumming, art and calligraphy demonstrations, and other cultural activities for all ages. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday to Sunday, April 24-26, Seattle Center (206-684-7200 or seattlecenter.com).

Concert for the Tiger and the Deep Blue Sea

A trio of veteran Seattle musicians — and longtime friends — join to present a “rousing response to global warming” as a tribute to the 45th anniversary of Earth Day. A cantata by activist/composer Fredrick N. West, director of the City Cantabile Choir, is on the bill, as is a premiere by Eduardo Mendonica, singer and co-director of Show Brazil. Kent Stevenson, composer, director and pianist rounds out the show, with guests including Shades of Praise, Jubilation and Phinney Ridge gospel choirs. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 25 and 7 p.m. Sunday, April 26, University Congregational Church, 4515 16th Ave. N.E., Seattle; $15-$20 (800-838-3006 or brownpapertickets.com).

Kelsey Creek Farm Sheep Shearing

Watch sheep get shorn of their winter coats, ride tractors, wagons and ponies, and nosh a wide array of food. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, April 25, Kelsey Creek Farm Park, 410 130th Place S.E., Bellevue; charges vary for food and activities, cash only (425-452-7688 or farmerjayne.com).

POP MUSIC

Leon Russell

With “The Wrecking Crew” back in theaters — a film about the Los Angeles studio sidemen who backed up everyone from the Beach Boys to Nancy Sinatra — card-carrying crew member Leon Russell is back in the limelight. Having survived some serious health issues, the mysterious-looking man with the long silver hair and flying fingers on the fretboard is promoting his new album, “Life Journey.” 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 21, at the Neptune Theatre, 1303 N.E. 45th St., Seattle; $33.50 (877-784-4849 or stgpresents.org).

CNTRL Tour: Richie Hawtin

Detroit techno pioneer Richie Hawtin talks about electronic music at a “master class” in the afternoon, then takes the stage for an audiovisual experience that translates his tonal blips and beats to a huge screen. Opening DJ sets from Dubfire and German DJ Chris Liebing. Market fair and lecture, 12 -5 p.m., concert at 9 p.m. Wednesday, April 22, at the Neptune Theatre, 1303 N.E. 45th St., Seattle.; lecture and fair, free, concert is $18.50-$26.50 (877-784-4849 or stgpresents.org).

LITERARY EVENTS

Jennifer Teege

The author, a black German woman, discusses her chilling memoir “My Grandfather Would have Shot Me: A Black Woman Discovers Her Family’s Nazi Past,” about how she discovered that her grandfather was the notorious Nazi Amon Goth, the villain of “Shindler’s List.” At 3 p.m. Sunday April 19, Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., Seattle; free (206-624-6600 or elliottbaybook.com).

Tony Angell

The renowned Northwest wildlife artist discusses his new book “The House of Owls,” about his life experiences with owls, their natural history and the art inspired by them. At 7 p.m. Thursday April 23, Northwest Stream Center, 600 128th St. S.E. McCollum Park, Everett; $5-$7, by reservation (425-316-8592 or streamkeeper.org).

THEATER

‘Robin Hood’

Seattle Children’s Theatre closes out its season with a remount of Greg Banks’ high-energy adaptation of the story of the famous bandit and his band of merry men. Through May 17, Seattle Children’s Theatre, Seattle Center; $25-$36 (206-441-3322 or sct.org).

VISUAL ARTS

Greg Kucera Gallery

Local artist Buster Simpson, tapped to collaborate with the Waterfront Seattle designers on a piece of public art for the revamped shoreline, has a wide-ranging show at Kucera. It is a chance for viewers to catch up with his vision and ponder what he might produce for the waterfront. His sense of what we do to the world around us is intact and unleashed; one of the pieces, “Duwamish Supper,” turns Leonardo’s famous dinner party into a stinking spread harvested from a polluted waterway. 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays through May 16, 212 Third Ave. S., Seattle (206-624-0770 or gregkucera.com).