Share story

A Place to Bury Strangers

8 p.m. Wednesday, March 18, at The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., Seattle; $13 (206-441-7416 or www.thecrocodile.com). With Nightmare Fortress, Grave Babies

A Place to Bury Strangers and the recently shuttered Death By Audio, a venue cofounded by the band’s singer/guitarist Oliver Ackermann, have long been cornerstones of the New York City rock scene.

The band’s fourth album “Transfixiation” is noisy, white-knuckle punk that sounds like it was honed at basement shows.

 

Rick Springfield

7 p.m. Wednesday, March 18, at The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., Seattle; $50 (206-784-4849 or www.stgpresents.org).

Though Rick Springfield had several hits in the United States, he’s usually remembered for “Jessie’s Girl,” a sad-sack ode to a friend’s hot girlfriend that’s pretty sexist even by the standards of 1981, when it topped the charts. This show is part of Springfield’s solo “Stripped Down” tour and features an audience question-and-answer session.

 

Tycho

7 p.m. Wednesday, March 18, at Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., Seattle; $23–$26 (360-652-0444 or www.showboxpresents.com). With Shigeto

Producer and visual artist Scott Hansen has taken Tycho—original his solo project, now expanded to a three-piece band—to lofty heights since releasing his first full-length 11 years ago. Its sound is ideal for festival-sized crowds: electronic music that flirts with post-rock and ambient music while never losing its sleepy pulse.

 

Hank & Cupcakes

7 p.m. Friday, March 20, at Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., Seattle; $10 (206-709-9951 or www.thebarboza.com). With HARPS, Dion Vox

Brooklyn duo Hank & Cupcakes play brash, bratty electro-pop with a slight punk edge. Most recent album “Cash For Gold,” is full of peppy, poppy songs that are informed by having a good time, even if it sometimes seems like the band is rather self-consciously trying to do just that.

Hurray for the Riff Raff

8 p.m. Friday, March 20, at The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., Seattle; $20 (206-441-7416 or www.thecrocodile.com). With Adia Victoria

Rather than a tribute to the carpetbagging rapper, Hurray for the Riff Raff is the endeavor of Alynda Lee Segarra, a singer, songwriter and banjo player who started the band in New Orleans in 2007. The group plays bluesy folk music that’s a product of the bayou, but with its roots firmly in the present, not the past.

 

Walk The Moon

7:30 p.m. Friday, March 20, and Saturday, March 21, at The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., Seattle; $25 (206-784-4849 or www.stgpresents.org). With The Griswolds

Pop-rock quartet Walk the Moon is currently having some radio success with “Shut Up and Dance,” a song that sounds like a major-label A&R guy’s idea of what the ’80s sounded like. The group occupies a similar space to what The Killers in the mid 2000s: grandiose, dancey pop that superficially recalls bands like Duran Duran and The Cure.

 

Above & Beyond

7 p.m. Saturday, March 21, at The Tacoma Dome, 2727 E. D St., Tacoma; $58 (253-272-3663 OR www.tacomadome.org). With 16 Bit Lolitas

Just before big-ticket electronic music was infiltrated by dubstep and hip-hop, it sounded a lot like Above & Beyond. The British trance trio’s tracks are ebullient and, true to the genre, perpetually evolving, perfect for evoking the sense of uplift and positivity that’s central to EDM events.

 

Little Wings

7:30 p.m. Monday, March 23, at The Vera Project, 305 Harrison St., Seattle; $8–$10 (360-956-8372 or www.theveraproject.org). With With Child

Both Little Wings (the project of Kyle Field) and opener Karl Blau are idiosyncratic musicians who are associated with the Olympia and Anacortes DIY scenes as well as K Records. They differ in approach. Field plays hushed, uncomfortably stripped-down folk; Blau’s oeuvre touches on livelier styles like psych and garage rock.

 

Bad Religion

8 p.m. Tuesday, March 24, at Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., Seattle; $30–$35 (360-652-0444 or www.showboxpresents.com). With OFF!

If the fact it’s playing the Showbox SoDo weren’t enough of an indication, Bad Religion is one of the most popular punk bands in the world. The Los Angeles–area band, led by Greg Graffin, has branched out significantly from punk over the years, incorporating prog, power pop and the band’s trademark complex vocal harmonies.

 

This Will Destroy You

8 p.m. Tuesday, March 24, at Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., Seattle; $12 (206-709-9442 or www.neumos.com). With Cymbals Eat Guitars

Perhaps the most impressive thing about This Will Destroy You is how the band never seems to be showing off or indulging itself, a rare thing in instrumental rock music. The Texas quartet has practiced its craft for more than 10 years, producing well-structured songs that veer from atmospheric to crushing and back again.