Movie review of “Get a Job”: It’s hard work finding work these days, is it not? Not according to this film. The process is largely a lark, and all will be well by the time the end credits roll in this anemic comedy. Rating: 2 stars out of 4.

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In the matter of searching for work in a difficult economy, “Get a Job” traffics in fairy tales that come complete with happily-ever-after endings.

In off the street and desperate for an interview with a big corporate boss? Corner him in an elevator at company headquarters and plead for a hearing. Initiative will be rewarded.

You’re new here, and you’ve just bungled a gazillion-dollar trade in a brokerage house? No problem. The boss says get back out there and make the money back.

Movie Review ★★  

‘Get a Job,’ Miles Teller, Anna Kendrick, Bryan Cranston, Brandon T. Jackson, Christopher Mintz-Plasse. Directed by Dylan Kidd, from a screenplay by Kyle Pennekamp and Scott Turpel. 82 minutes. Rated R for crude and sexual content, nudity, drug use and language. Varsity.

Need to fake a drug test, but your intake of the funny weed is such that there’s no way you’ll pass? Hey, Dad. Fill this jar for me. Problem solved.

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And so it goes in this comedy rife with pee gags, pot jokes — hey, check out this killer bong I made out of tubing taken from the chem class I teach — and jokes revolving around a visit to a strip club. Job-search tips offered by a pole dancer.

It’s 20- and early-30-somethings who are the job hunters, with Anna Kendrick (“Pitch Perfect”) and Miles Teller (you know, the guy from “Whiplash”) being the best known among the actors portraying them. Bryan Cranston is in the mix in the role of the Teller character’s father, who has been downsized out of his executive position and so needs help from his arrogant and overly dependent son to figure out how to navigate the tricky waters of modern-day employment seeking.

It’s hard work finding work these days, is it not? Not according to “Get a Job.” It’s largely a lark, and all will be well by the time the end credits roll.