Movie review of “All Things Must Pass: The Rise and Fall of Tower Records”: Colin Hanks directed this irresistible documentary about the evolution of the music business. Rating: 3.5 stars out of 4.

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Colin Hanks makes his feature directing debut with this irresistible documentary about the evolution of the music business. George Harrison could be said to have inspired the title, and Tower Records provided the venue.

It’s obviously a labor of love for Tom Hanks’ son, who presented the local premiere at the Seattle International Film Festival in May at the Harvard Exit. The occasion was bittersweet because it was one of the last movies shown at the Exit, a local art-house legend that closed in January but reopened briefly for SIFF.

Tower also had its troubles. Begun by Russ Solomon in a Sacramento drugstore in the 1960s, it expanded to San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle and beyond, attracting not only fans but also artists including Bruce Springsteen, who was interviewed for the film and attests to Tower’s value.

Movie Review ★★★½   

‘All Things Must Pass: The Rise and Fall of Tower Records,’ a documentary directed by Colin Hanks, from a screenplay by Steven Leckart. 100 minutes. Not rated. Sundance (21+).

To say that “All Things Must Pass” was a SIFF crowd-pleaser at the Exit would be an understatement. Hanks’ energy was matched by the audience’s enthusiasm for a fascinating story that includes numerous ups and downs and mini revolutions.

It all seemed to end in 2006, when the last Tower store closed in the United States. But that wasn’t necessarily the finale, as Hanks demonstrates with a segment about Tower still being “big in Japan.”