Topher Grace was admittedly nervous about his first scene with Dennis Quaid on the set of "In Good Company" — and it didn't help when...

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Topher Grace was admittedly nervous about his first scene with Dennis Quaid on the set of “In Good Company” — and it didn’t help when Quaid left him hanging.

After Quaid filmed his part of the scene, Grace noticed his co-star had gone missing.

“I think (director) Paul (Weitz) did his side of it first so I could get the flow going,” Grace said. “And then they turned around the cameras during lunch on me. I came back and (Quaid’s) stand-in was there and he said, ‘I’ll be reading Dennis’ lines while we do this scene.’ ”

It was just the kind of spoiled-star behavior that makes for Hollywood horror stories. It was also Quaid’s idea of a joke.

“I was just over at the bar with Paul just watching these beads of sweat (appear),” Quaid said with a smile. “The inner monologue going on. It was good.”

Grace, a relative newcomer to films who’s known mostly from “That ’70s Show,” was intimidated by Quaid’s credentials but not by the actor himself, whom he calls an “easy-going, nice guy.”

Grace (“Win a Date With Tad Hamilton!” “Mona Lisa Smile”) plays Carter Duryea, a twentysomething exec who’s appointed advertising director at a sports magazine and must supervise Dan Foreman (Quaid), the experienced former department head. Carter’s job grows more difficult when he’s romantically drawn to Dan’s college-age daughter Alex (Scarlett Johansson).

Grace, 26, said he’d like to think his relationship with Quaid “is the opposite of our characters’ relationship.

Grace occasionally had to remind himself of Quaid’s long list of films, which stretches back to 1975 and includes “Breaking Away” (1979), “Great Balls of Fire!” (1989), “Wyatt Earp” (1994), “Frequency” (2000) and “Traffic” (2000), which also featured Grace.

“It’s easy to underestimate him, but you’ve got to look at that body of work,” Grace said.