Editor’s note: COVID-19 protocols and other details for events are subject to change. Please check your event’s website for the latest information, and heed local health authorities’ safety recommendations.

What’s Happening Oct. 22-28

When considering the future of a world forever changed by COVID-19, members of local libraries, public health groups, artists and community organizers came together to create What the World Needs Now: A Dreamathon.” This arts-oriented campaign aims to dream up solutions to guide people through the next stage of the pandemic. On Friday and Saturday, Oct. 22-23, Dreamathon invites participants to create and propose solutions by and for the communities that have been affected the most by the pandemic.

The weekend of Dreamathon events represents the finale of Seattle Public Library’s public health series. The campaign stems from a recognition that the fall and winter seasons of 2020 felt particularly isolating for many, said Davida Ingram, the public engagement programs manager at Seattle Public Library.

“We wanted to do something that was inspiring and courageous and responsive and took into stride that, ‘Yes, we have vaccines; yes, we have some polarization; and, yes, we truly should be having a conversation around how we can stay safe together with a lot of creativity’ … So that’s why we said sometimes the most practical thing we can do right now is to dream,” Ingram said.

This event art is by Kisira Hill, a cultural and biological anthropologist, graphic designer and content creator who uses her creativity to illustrate intersectionality. Her graphics bring people and communities pushed to the margins right to the center. (Courtesy of Kisira Hill)

Dreamathon also aims to recognize the hard work of community leaders throughout the pandemic. The events serve as an opportunity to “celebrate the incredible civic leadership from communities on the frontlines. They did some pretty incredible work just to figure out how to get their communities what they needed, whether it was mutual aid, food, access to vaccines or answers to their questions,” Ingram said.

On Oct. 22, Dreamathon transforms into a virtual dance party for those over the age of 18.

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Grammy-nominated singer Will Jordan will begin the virtual community celebration with an opening performance Oct. 23. Topics of community well-being, health, affordable food, incarcerated youth and substance use will be explored by speakers including Dr. Ben Danielson, a pediatrician, and Aaron Dixon, co-founder of the Black Panther Seattle chapter. It will also include community chat breakout sessions (with topics such as good eating, Indigenous cultural insights, Black wellness and more), live performances, poetry and documentary storytelling and a cooking segment.

The community celebration will move through different age groups, beginning with conversations with youth ages 12 and under at the start of the program, then moving to teenagers, young adults and older participants. These virtual conversations and community chats open the door for people across the state to “learn from communities who have done such amazing work during the pandemic offering connection and inspiration and joy,” said Elisa Murray, digital communications strategist at Seattle Public Library.

After the Dreamathon campaign ends, the ideas dreamed up will be shared with the public and policymakers across Washington as part of a broader statewide health equity initiative called Well WA.

“Our communities know what we need. We’ve always known,” said Denisse Guerrero, a field organizer at Washington Community Alliance, one of the groups organizing the Dreamathon campaign. “Starting with joy and gratitude, we’re using fun as a way to share and amplify our own solutions. We’re grounding ourselves in our collective brilliance and our ability to keep us well,” she said.

Dreamathon will take place online 7:30-9 p.m. Oct. 22 and 2-4 p.m. Oct. 23. Find more information and RSVP at: spl.org/programs-and-services/social-justice/social-justice-series/public-health/dreamathon

What else is happening

Here are some other events happening Oct. 22-28 in the Puget Sound area. If you would like to submit an event for consideration, please fill out the form at the bottom of the post.

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Luca Stricagnoli at Kent’s Spotlight Series — Oct. 22

City of Kent Parks Department and Kent Arts Commission host Kent’s Spotlight Series with Luca Stricagnoli at 7:30 p.m. This concert will feature tunes from up to five guitars in the same piece, modified capos and other innovative playing techniques. Purchase tickets online; $28/adults, $26/seniors, $15/youth. 10020 S.E. 256th St., Kent; 253-856-5000; kentwa.gov

“What You Are to Me” — Oct. 22

After 20 months sharing chamber music on digital platforms, Emerald City Music returns with its first mainstage program in its sixth season at 8 and 10 p.m. “What You Are to Me” includes Martinu’s Variations on a Theme of Rossini, H. 290 for Cello and Piano (1942) and Korngold’s Suite for Two Violins, Cello and Left Hand Piano (1930). Purchase tickets online; $55. 415 Westlake Ave., Seattle; 206-250-5510; emeraldcitymusic.org

Essential Evergreens — Oct. 23

Sunnyside Nursery hosts an online class on conifers at 10 a.m. Participants will learn about the varieties of sizes, textures, colors and forms with horticulturist and conifer enthusiast Trevor Cameron. Register online; free. sunnysidenursery.net 

Jafco Sewer Series Cup — Oct. 23

Jafco Plumbing and Sewer presents a multidivision skateboarding competition 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. 3500 Stone Way N., Seattle; 206-552-3560; eventbrite.com

Diwali: Lights of India — Oct. 23

Seattle Center Festál presents Diwali: Lights of India at noon. The virtual festival will feature art, music, dance, cooking and traditions of India. Streaming online; free. seattlecenter.com

Zombie Walk — Oct. 23

Downtown Issaquah Association’s Zombie Walk returns for its 11th year 2-6 p.m. Participants are invited to awaken their inner zombie with friends and family through online makeup tutorials, “Time Warp” and “Thriller” dance classes and even Stan’s Bar-B-Q $1 eyeballs (meatballs). Free. Downtown Issaquah; downtownissaquah.com

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Poe Unexpected — Oct. 24

Unexpected Productions hosts an evening of improv inspired by the works of Edgar Allan Poe. Purchase tickets online; $15. 1428 Post Alley, Seattle; 206-587-2414; unexpectedproductions.org

Introduction to Day of the Dead — Oct. 24

Learn about the practices of Día de los Muertos both online and in-person 3-5 p.m. from Rene De Los Santos, the Latino and community outreach coordinator and diversity and inclusion trainer for the YMCA of Snohomish County. Los Santos will share the tradition of the fiesta, show participants how to set up a Día de los Muertos altar and invite all to reflect and share. Participants are encouraged to wear bright clothing and bring photographs or favorite foods of beloved family members who have passed on. RSVP online; $20. 5031 University Way N.E., Seattle; gatheringround.org

Bizarre Bats of the World — Oct. 26

King County Library System hosts a virtual class about bats of the world 4-5 p.m. Participants will explore bat misconceptions and how the animals are essential to the health of ecosystems and agricultural economy. Register online; free. kcls.org

Rock, Roll and Howl at the Moon — Oct. 28

W Seattle hosts a dog-friendly Halloween event 5-8 p.m. There will be treats for both humans and canines, a costume contest with prizes, swag and a signature cocktail to benefit Motley Zoo Animal Rescue. Register online; free. 1112 Fourth Ave., Seattle; 206-264-6000; marriott.com