Fall brings a vast crop of authors to town; here are just a few mark-your-calendar names.

Jacqueline Woodson

The acclaimed author of numerous books for young people (and currently the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature), Woodson thrilled adult readers with her bestselling novel “Another Brooklyn,” a finalist for the National Book Award. She returns to adult fiction with her latest book, “Red at the Bone,” in which two families from different social classes are joined by an unexpected pregnancy.

7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24; Seattle Public Library’s Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., Seattle; free; 206-386-4636, spl.org

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Ijeoma Oluo 

Local author Oluo, who describes herself online as a “writer, speaker, and Internet Yeller,” wrote the bestselling 2018 book “So You Want To Talk About Race.” At Town Hall, she’ll talk about race — specifically, on topics ranging from intersectionality to affirmative action to “model minorities” — in conversation with The Stranger’s associate editor Charles Mudede.

7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2; Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., Seattle; $5; 206-652-4255, townhallseattle.org

Patti Smith

Singer/songwriter, visual artist, Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee, poet, National Book Award winner (2010’s “Just Kids”) — Smith’s artistic career has been long and eventful. She’ll speak about her latest memoir, “The Year of the Monkey,” which focuses on a recent year spent in solitary wandering and American dreaming.

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7:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6; Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., Seattle; tickets from $42 (includes copy of book); 206-621-2230, lectures.org

Monique Truong

Monique Truong, author of “The Sweetest Fruits”
 (Haruka Sakaguchi)
Monique Truong, author of “The Sweetest Fruits” (Haruka Sakaguchi)

Truong’s acclaimed debut novel, “The Book of Salt,” introduced us to a cook in the home of Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas; her follow-up, “Bitter in the Mouth,” took us to a small North Carolina town. Now with her latest novel, “The Sweetest Fruits,” she’s taking us to another unexpected place: the remarkable, globe-trotting life of Lafcadio Hearn, a 19th-century writer, wanderer and cookbook author.

7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10; Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., Seattle; free; 206-624-6600, elliottbaybook.com

Rachel Maddow

MSNBC television anchor Rachel Maddow will be in Seattle this fall promoting a new book. (Steven Senne / The Associated Press, file)
MSNBC television anchor Rachel Maddow will be in Seattle this fall promoting a new book. (Steven Senne / The Associated Press, file)

The host of MSNBC’s “Rachel Maddow Show” — and author of the bestselling book “Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power” — speaks about her newest book, “Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth.”

8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11; Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., Seattle; individual tickets sold out but subscriptions are available and standby tickets ($40) may be available on a limited basis (numbers handed out at box office beginning 1.5 hours before event); 206-621-2230, lectures.org

Timothy Egan

A lifelong Seattleite, award-winning author/journalist Egan is the author of nine books, including the bestselling biography “The Immortal Irishman: The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero.“ His latest, “A Pilgrimage to Eternity,” is both a history of Christianity and a very personal story of his own adventures on an ancient European pilgrimage trail, the Via Francigena.

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7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15; Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., Seattle; $35 admits one, $40 admits two, both prices include one copy of book; 206-652-4255, townhallseattle.org

Jeanette Winterson

Mary Shelley’s horror classic “Frankenstein” turned 200 years old last year — and this year it’s the inspiration for Winterson’s latest novel, “Frankissstein,” which weaves the story of Shelley’s creation together with several contemporary plotlines, including one of a transgender doctor in love with a professor/mad scientist named Victor Stein. Winterson’s previous works include her acclaimed debut, “Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit.”

7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16; Seattle Public Library’s Central Library, 1000 4th Ave., Seattle; free; 206-386-4636, spl.org

Paul Theroux

Novelist/travel writer Theroux (“Ghost Train to the Eastern Star,” “The Mosquito Coast”) turns his attention to the U.S./Mexico border in his latest, timely book, “On the Plain of Snakes: A Mexican Journey,” about his drive along the entire length of the border.

7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16; Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., Seattle; $5; 206-652-4255, townhallseattle.org

Ta-Nehisi Coates

The author Ta-Nehisi Coates will be in Seattle this fall. (Cole Wilson / The New York Times)
The author Ta-Nehisi Coates will be in Seattle this fall. (Cole Wilson / The New York Times)

Coates, author of the bestselling nonfiction books “The Beautiful Struggle,” “Between the World and Me,” and “We Were Eight Years in Power,” returns to the Seattle Arts & Lectures stage with a new identity: novelist. His first book of fiction, “The Water Dancer,” tells of a young man born into slavery in Virginia who discovers that he has mysterious powers.

7:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20; Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., Seattle; individual tickets sold out but subscriptions are available and standby tickets ($40) may be available on a limited basis (numbers handed out at box office beginning 1.5 hours before event); 206-621-2230, lectures.org

André Aciman

The Oscar-winning movie “Call Me By Your Name” brought the name and work of novelist André Aciman, on whose book it was based, to new audiences. Now he’s back with a sequel: “Find Me,” which reunites us with Oliver and Elio, decades after their first meeting.

7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 4; Seattle Public Library’s Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., Seattle; free; 206-386-4636, spl.org

Saeed Jones

Jones, an acclaimed poet whose debut collection “Prelude to Bruise” was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, comes to town with his much-anticipated new memoir: “How We Fight For Our Lives,” about coming of age as a black gay man in the South. Kirkus Reviews described it as “the emergence of a major literary voice.”

7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7; Northwest African American Museum, 2300 S. Massachusetts St., Seattle; free; 206-624-6600, elliottbaybook.com

David Sedaris

David Sedaris, author of “Calypso” (Ingrid Christie)
David Sedaris, author of “Calypso” (Ingrid Christie)

The man who changed the way all of us think about Santaland elves returns to Seattle for his annual reading — and, it’s certain, to make us all laugh. In his latest collection of essays, “Calypso,” which I reviewed last year, I started marking pages where something made me giggle. I ran out of markers. But it’s also a very poignant book, reflecting on the death of his sister, his relationship to his father, and on how middle age brings a wistful awareness of mortality.

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7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 10; Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., Seattle; tickets from $52; 206-215-4747, seattlesymphony.org

Amor Towles

Who among us didn’t devour the elegant prose and irresistible story of “A Gentleman in Moscow”? (Which is, for the record, FINALLY in paperback.) Towles is a former investment banker whose two novels — his debut was “Rules of Civility” in 2011 — have both been bestsellers; clearly this writing thing is working out pretty well for him.

7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12; Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., Seattle; individual tickets sold out but subscriptions are available and standby tickets ($40) may be available on a limited basis (numbers handed out at box office beginning 1.5 hours before event); 206-621-2230, lectures.org

Tom Perrotta

The author of “Election,” “Little Children,” “The Leftovers,” “Mrs. Fletcher” and other slyly delightful novels will speak on the topic of “Laughter Is Only the Beginning,” discussing how he balances satire, comedy and psychological realism in his work.

7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14; Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave., Seattle; tickets from $12; 206-322-7030, hugohouse.org

Gloria Steinem

Co-founder of Ms. magazine and icon of modern American feminism, Steinem is visiting Seattle to talk about her life and work — and to promote her new book, “The Truth Will Set You Free, But First It Will Piss You Off! Thoughts on Life, Love, and Rebellion.”

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7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21; Paramount Theatre, 911 Pine St., Seattle; $15.50-$55.50 (latter includes copy of book); 800-982-2787, stgpresents.org

Lindy West

Speaking as part of Seattle Arts & Lectures “Women You Need to Know” series, West is a local author whose voice is now heard nationally: in her bestselling memoir “Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman” (which she adapted last year as a series for Hulu), and in her frequent opinion pieces for The New York Times. She’ll appear in celebration of her new book out this fall, the essay collection “The Witches Are Coming.”

7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 26; Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., Seattle; individual tickets sold out but subscriptions are available and standby tickets ($40) may be available on a limited basis (numbers handed out at box office beginning 1.5 hours before event); 206-621-2230, lectures.org