This season, Moira’s Seattle Times Book Club is having some fun with Summer Book Bingo, presented by Seattle Public Library and Seattle Arts & Lectures. Here are five options for our next selection, all recommended by SPL and suitable for filling out a specific Summer Book Bingo category. Please vote by noon Monday, June 29, and check seattletimes.com/books for an announcement of the winner on Tuesday, June 30. Then join us online to discuss the book at noon on Wednesday, July 29.

Ripper: A Novel” by Isabel Allende (translated from the Spanish by Ollie Brock and Frank Wynne). The acclaimed Chilean author, whose books include “The House of the Spirits,” here tries her hand at a contemporary thriller, in which a teenage San Francisco sleuth sets out to track a serial killer. (Bingo category: A SAL Speaker, or In Translation)

The Widows of Malabar Hill” by Sujata Massey. How did SPL know that I bought this book a while ago and haven’t gotten to it yet? Massey’s 2018 novel, set in 1920s Bombay, is the first of a series featuring Perveen Mistry, Bombay’s first female solicitor. (Bingo category: Books on Your Shelf)

The Bluest Eye” by Toni Morrison. What better time than now to read (or reread) this 1970 classic of Black literature, set in post-Depression Ohio? In it, a young girl named Pecola, bullied for her dark skin, dreams of having blue eyes. (Bingo category: Mentioned In Another Book)

Mrs. Dalloway” by Virginia Woolf. Nearly a century old, Woolf’s stream-of-consciousness novel taking place on an ordinary June day in London is still considered one of the great modern novels. (Bingo category: Published in the 1920s)

The Shadow of the Wind” by Carlos Ruiz Zafon (translated from the Spanish by Lucia Graves). One of the most successful Spanish-language novels of all time, Zafon’s 2001 book is a story-within-a-story, set around the time of the Spanish Civil War and beginning with a visit to the Cemetery of Forgotten Books. A sad timeliness to this selection: Zafon died this month, aged just 55. (Bingo category: Set in a City of Literature, or In Translation)