The metropolitan areas with the biggest slides in average credit scores are mainly the ones hit hard by the housing collapse, such as in...

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The metropolitan areas with the biggest slides in average credit scores are mainly the ones hit hard by the housing collapse, such as in Florida and California, according to Experian.

But the city with the biggest one-year decline among 192 metro areas is an exception. Tucked in with glitzy Las Vegas and Miami is Bangor, Maine, which used to call itself the “Lumber Capital of the World” during the 1800s. Its median home price was $130,300 in the first quarter, according to Global Insight and National City. That’s down slightly from the previous quarter but up from $128,200 in the year-earlier period. Unemployment jumped to 5.7 percent in March after layoffs at several saw mills, but the rate eased to 4.7 percent in April.

To be sure, Bangor’s drop in credit scores is from a high level. Scores are still well above the national average of 693.

Clawbacks

More companies are starting policies to take back bonuses paid to executives if it turns out they were based on incorrect or “cooked” financial results, according to the Corporate Library. Of 2,121 companies surveyed, 295 — or 14 percent — said they have such “clawback” provisions. That’s up from just 14 out of 1,800 companies in 2003.

Place your bets

Much rides on the Triple Crown — for Wall Street, according to research by Larry Adam, chief investment strategist for Deutsche Bank Private Wealth Management.

Since 1930, the S&P 500 has dropped 6.4 percent, on average, during the calendar year that a Triple Crown win occurs; in 1930, Gallant Fox won the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes.

On the flip side, the market has done well when a horse comes into the Belmont with a chance at the Triple Crown but loses. During such years, the S&P 500 has risen 10.8 percent, on average.

To be sure, Adam admits the correlation is likely more coincidental than predictive.

The Associated Press