The Wall Street Journal miles away from Wall Street? Covering sports? Yes, the paper that has chronicled business from lower Manhattan for...

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NEW YORK — The Wall Street Journal miles away from Wall Street? Covering sports?

Yes, the paper that has chronicled business from lower Manhattan for 119 years is making plans to start a sports page and move to the midtown offices of its new corporate parent, News Corp., according to people briefed on the matters.

Seven weeks after taking over The Journal, Rupert Murdoch, the chairman and chief executive of News Corp., is making good on his plans to integrate it with his media empire and to broaden the paper’s interests and appeal.

News Corp. completed its purchase of Dow Jones on Dec. 13 for more than $5 billion.

A move to midtown would be embraced more readily by Journal employees than some other changes Murdoch has proposed. The Journal’s offices overlook the World Trade Center site, a raw daily reminder of Sept. 11, 2001. A cloud of toxic dust forced the paper and its neighbors to abandon the area for nearly a year.

The move would also make for easier commuting for people who live in the suburbs and take commuter trains and buses, which go to midtown.

“People are more than ready to do this,” a Journal employee said.

The Journal has never been based more than a quick walk away from the street it was named for. For most of its history it was on Broad Street, around the corner, and then on Cortlandt Street, four short blocks to the north.

Murdoch says he wants The Journal to expand its nonbusiness coverage, especially in areas like politics, government and entertainment, while also making it more inviting and easier to read. Adding sports reporting would seem to fit into that strategy.

The Journal regularly covers the business of sports, but does not cover the sports themselves extensively. But in recent years, seeking more ads aimed at consumers rather than businesses, it has greatly expanded its lifestyle and consumer reporting, adding “softer” sections like Personal Journal and Weekend Journal, and a Saturday newspaper.

Covering sports events that last late into the night would be logistically difficult for The Journal, which goes to press unusually early for a major newspaper. Murdoch said at a recent meeting of bureau chiefs and editors that he wanted to find a way to allow later deadlines.