In a rare intervention by the government, the Trump administration has moved to stall the potential takeover of Qualcomm, the leading U.S. chipmaker, by Singapore-based Broadcom on national security grounds.

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A possible merger of two giant makers of computer chips could revolutionize the key industry — which touches everything from smartphones to cars — and shift the balance of power from California to Asia. Washington, D.C., isn’t so sure that’s a good idea.

In a rare intervention by the government, the Trump administration moved Sunday night to stall the potential takeover of Qualcomm, the leading U.S. chipmaker, by Singapore-based Broadcom on national-security grounds. The action, by a little-known and secretive government panel, represents a newly aggressive posture to protect national corporate champions and scrutinize acquisitions by overseas companies.

The panel, the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, or CFIUS, typically works behind closed doors and reviews deals only after they are announced. With Qualcomm, the panel, which includes representatives from multiple government agencies, is looking at the acquisition before it is complete.

The heightened scrutiny reflects the growing concern by President Donald Trump and lawmakers over the flurry of deals in the U.S. by foreign companies. The worry is that the United States is giving up an edge in areas like technology, as China and other countries gain ground.

CFIUS is intervening as Trump prepares this week to impose hefty tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum.

“This is not the last part of this story,” said Derek Scissors, a scholar at the conservative American Enterprise Institute who has called for CFIUS to stall the deal. “People woke up to realize that if steel is important to national security, then telecoms and semiconductors are also important to national security.”

On Sunday, CFIUS instructed Qualcomm to delay by 30 days its annual shareholder meeting, which had been scheduled for Tuesday. Investors were poised to vote at the meeting on the Broadcom bid. The annual meeting, now scheduled for April 5, will give the panel time to review the transaction.

Broadcom’s attempted takeover of Qualcomm, first unveiled in November, would be the largest technology deal in history.