As much as economic bubbles keep bursting all about us these days, it seems only a matter of time before the same happens to the ultrahip Web 2.0 phenomenon.

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As much as economic bubbles keep bursting all about us these days, it seems only a matter of time before the same happens to the ultrahip Web 2.0 phenomenon.

In fact, as our Brier Dudley noted in his blog last week, it may already be happening, given that even the tech magazines are making fun of the “cool kids” of Web. 2.0.

His case in point: PCMag’s feature listing the 10 “most absurd” social networks — you know, sites such as Dogster, a network for dog lovers that claims to have three-quarters-of-a-million members and monthly visitors.

Where else can you take a poll on this question: “California Gov, Arnold Schwarzenegger just vetoed a proposal to fine drivers with pets on their laps. How do you think dogs should ride in cars?” The choices, presumably to be filled in by humans, are: “1. In the backseat, baby. 2. Seatbelted and restrained. 3. However they want!”

One local connection on the list was Coolspotters, a site that puts the prefix “ultra” into celebrity-watching. It’s not all fluff, though, at least by investment standards. Some heavy hitters from Seattle are behind the Collinsville, Conn.-based site: Second Avenue Partners, Zillow CEO Rich Barton and the Curious Office Partners incubator.

Here’s the list, as taken from PCMag’s news release:

1. Line for Heaven: A religious social network that allows users to bless others and be blessed in return.

2. ncludr: The “social network where everyone and everything is your friend.”

3. Dogster: Dog owners showcase their canines on profile pages, complete with the dog’s age, sex, favorite food and photos.

4. Foretal: A community for making and voting on predictions. If a prediction turns out to be true, the site’s administrators declare winners and losers, …

5. Familybuilder: Using your DNA, Familybuilder connects you with relatives, building family trees across all the major social networks.

6. RedKaraoke: RedKaraoke.com still provides more than 17,000 performances on the Web, including 26 karaoke versions of Rihanna’s “Umbrella.”

7. Coolspotters: Catering to celebrity fanatics, the site shares the products, brands, and styles used by the rich and famous.

8. HotEnough.org: To get your photo posted on HotEnough.org, you must send three photos to be screened by the dating site’s editors.

9. Geek Match Making: Find the geek of your dreams.

10. Kirtsy: Features popular stories and articles on “girly” topics.

“Not involved”

How many ways can you say, “I didn’t have anything to do with it.” For Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, at least a few.

On Friday, the company filed documents seeking to keep Ballmer from being deposed in the so-called Vista Capable suit. That’s the class-action case in which a Camano Island woman sued Microsoft in April 2007 because the computer she purchased in November 2006, marked “Vista Capable,” could handle only the basic version of Microsoft’s new operating system, which did not have all the features touted in the company’s marketing.

In its Friday filing, Microsoft included a statement from Ballmer saying he wasn’t familiar with the marketing: “I was not involved in any of the operational decisions about the Windows Vista Capable program. I was not involved in establishing the requirements computers must satisfy to qualify for the Windows Vista Capable program. I was not involved in formulating any market strategy or any public messaging surrounding the Windows Vista Capable program. To the best of my recollection, I do not have any unique knowledge of nor did I have any unique involvement in any decisions regarding the Windows Vista Capable program. All of my knowledge about those decisions came through other people at Microsoft, notably Jim Allchin, Microsoft’s then-co-President, Platforms Products & Services, and Will Poole, Microsoft’s then Senior Vice President, Windows Client Business. … “

Download, a column of news bits, observations and miscellany, is gathered by The Seattle Times technology staff. We can be reached at 206-464-2265 or biztech@seattletimes.com.