Viome provides “diet and lifestyle advice” based on an analysis of microbes in the digestive system.

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Viome, a wellness technology startup founded by serial entrepreneur Naveen Jain, has reeled in $15 million in venture-capital funding, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Viome, based in Bellevue, earlier this year indicated its aim to eliminate diseases, with a news release bearing the tagline “imagine a world where illness is optional.”

The company is not there yet. Today, Viome provides “diet and lifestyle advice” based on an analysis of microbes in the digestive system and elsewhere in the body. The service, which asks buyers to submit blood, saliva, stool and other samples for analysis, costs $59 a month, or $599 a year.

The company’s underlying technology is licensed from the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Viome says.

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Jain has said that down the line he would seek Food and Drug Administration approval to diagnose diseases, but it’s unclear whether Viome has taken that step. The company’s website includes the disclaimer that Viome’s products are not designed to diagnose or treat any disease.

A spokesman for Jain declined to comment beyond Friday’s SEC filing.

Viome is the latest company led by Jain, best known for founding InfoSpace, a dot-com-era startup that he once said would become the world’s first trillion-dollar company.

Instead, InfoSpace’s stock market valuation crashed with the dot-com bust, and a Seattle Times investigation found that Jain, ousted by the board in 2002, had worked with other executives to boost InfoSpace’s stock price with controversial investments and misleading public statements. Jain has denied those claims.

In 2015, he sold Intelius, the online background check firm he founded after leaving InfoSpace, to a Miami private equity firm.

Jain last year raised $6.7 million for a venture called BlueDot, which aimed to form businesses like Viome that try to commercialize government research in health care and energy.