A behind-the-scenes winner in Amazon’s big Whole Foods acquisition may be Seattle company Impinj, a maker of radio-frequency identification technology.

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A behind-the-scenes winner in Amazon’s big Whole Foods acquisition may be Seattle company Impinj, a maker of radio-frequency identification technology.

Impinj’s stock soared $8.94, or 19.1 percent, to close at $55.71 Friday as investors grew curious about a link between the newly public company, Amazon and the world of groceries.

Impinj’s RFID tags and readers are used widely in retail and health care to track inventory and plan deliveries. Amazon is a member of the Impinj-led “RAIN Alliance,” Barron’s points out, a group that is designed to study and encourage the technology.

Impinj and Amazon are co-hosting an event for the alliance in Seattle next month, Impinj CEO Chris Diorio said during an earnings conference call in May.

Impinj went public last July, raising about $67.2 million in its IPO and rocketing 28 percent on its first day of trading. Since then, the company’s stock price has nearly tripled.

Impinj’s stock ended the day Friday up more than 19 percent, to $55.71 per share.

There’s no guarantee that Amazon is using, or will use, Impinj’s technology. Speculation circulated late last year that the e-commerce giant might adopt Impinj’s tags when it opened its Amazon Go cashierless grocery format — which has not advanced yet beyond a test site closed to the general public. At the time, Impinj said it couldn’t comment on a potential partnership with Amazon.

Impinj said Friday it does not comment on “existing or prospective customers.”