Women made about 80 cents for every dollar men earned in 2015, according to U.S. government data. In technical jobs, that number is 96 cents on the dollar, according to Hired. But there are still challenges for women’s salaries in the field.

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The year is 2152. Self-driving cars have given way to self-flying vehicles. The moon is a popular vacation destination. And women and men have just achieved pay equity.

At the rate the gender wage gap is closing, it would take the next 135 years for it to completely shut, according to data from San Francisco-based jobs platform Hired.

Tuesday is Equal Pay Day, a day always in April to show how far into the year women must work to earn what men did in the previous year. Women made about 80 cents for every dollar men earned in 2015, according to U.S. government data.

In tech jobs, that number is 96 cents on the dollar, according to 2016 data from Hired. But there are still challenges for women’s salaries in the field.

Hired focuses on technical jobs in the tech industry, such as software engineers, and collects its data from job seekers and companies up to the point when a final job offer is made.

Women working in the tech industry get offered lower salaries than men 63 percent of the time, at the same company for the same position, Hired’s national data shows.

In Seattle, women in these tech roles are asking for 12 percent less than what men ask in salary negotiations before being hired. They are ultimately being offered 11 percent less than their male counterparts in the same job role.

Women in tech jobs are offered an overall average of $116,000 in Seattle, compared with $128,000 for men, according to Hired.

Hired’s data also found that pay inequity increases based on race and sexual orientation. Black women in tech nationally are paid 79 cents for every dollar white men make. White women, in contrast, make 90 cents.

The news isn’t all discouraging. Seattle real estate tech company Zillow says it is ahead of the curve. Its female employees, on average, make $1.01 for every dollar their male peers make, the company said in a blog post Tuesday.