The case involves Microsoft’s effort challenging the constitutionality of a law that can prohibit tech companies from informing customers when law enforcement agencies seek to collect the customers’ data.

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The American Civil Liberties Union is taking Microsoft’s side in a privacy battle against the federal government.

The ACLU entered a filing Thursday to join Microsoft in a lawsuit the tech company has brought against the U.S. government that challenges the government’s “gag order” process while seizing online data.

Microsoft filed its suit in April challenging the constitutionality of a law that can prohibit tech companies from telling customers when law enforcement agencies seek to collect their data. About half of the warrants Microsoft receives from law enforcement agencies seeking data stored online are accompanied by so-called gag orders that prevent Microsoft from telling the customer.

The ACLU, a customer of Microsoft’s, agrees with Microsoft that companies should be allowed to notify customers of the warrants. The organization goes a step further, saying the government should be required to inform the customers directly when such warrants are issued.

“A basic promise of our Constitution is that the government must notify you at some point when it searches or seizes your private information,” Alex Abdo, a senior staff attorney with the ACLU, said in a statement. “Notice serves as a crucial check on executive power, and it has been a regular and constitutionally required feature of searches and seizures since the nation’s founding.”

Microsoft’s lawsuit comes at a time when tech companies are increasingly pushing the federal government to update its laws concerning technology, including the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. The law was passed in 1986, long before much of the technology used today was developed.