Starbucks is making a longtime employee status symbol — the pocket guide it gives its baristas to help them learn the intricacies of coffee — available to customers worldwide, in the form of an app.

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Starbucks is making a longtime employee status symbol — the pocket guide it gives its baristas to help them learn the intricacies of coffee — available to customers worldwide, in the form of an app.

It’s the coffee giant’s latest bid to extend its coffee-shop dominion, a way to draw in new, smartphone-toting customers and keep them tightly linked to the brand.

It’s also about reminding coffee snobs, a growing demographic that has recently favored the likes of Stumptown and Blue Bottle Coffee, that Starbucks knows its way around high-end beans.

And it’s part of Starbucks’ strategy of “premiumization” — a buzzword beloved by the beverage industry that means encouraging mass-market consumers to trade up in quality and price.

The printed guide, dubbed the Starbucks Coffee Passport, has been given to baristas since the early 1990s. It’s a small booklet that describes the flavor and other features of the many types of coffee the company sells.

During group coffee tastings — a common ritual at Starbucks — employees jot down their own observations in the pocket guide, which also acts as a log, and they get stamps representing the types of java tasted.

Starbucks says the digital version was developed for its own employees, who got access to it last month. But customers can log in starting Tuesday.

The app is Web-based and can be accessed via a mobile phone’s browser at passport.starbucks.com.

It contains a guide on how to appraise coffee, explaining features such as body, acidity, aroma and flavor. It also offers walk-throughs for different brewing methods, from french press to iced pour-over and lyrical descriptions of a wide array of coffees.

For instance, it describes Starbucks’ Organic Yukon Blend as “big and balanced with a liveliness at the start and herbal depth in the finish.”

A fancier bag of single-origin, small-batch beans — the Aged Sumatra Lot No. 044 — is said to have “saddle leather aromas, with a syrupy mouthfeel and flavors of butterscotch and maple.”