Seattle-based Saltchuk Resources said Thursday it has offered to buy the cargo operations of Aloha Airlines, which filed for Chapter 11...

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HONOLULU — Seattle-based Saltchuk Resources said Thursday it has offered to buy the cargo operations of Aloha Airlines, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection last week.

Terms of the offer weren’t disclosed.

Saltchuk’s bid for the Honolulu carrier’s cargo assets, equipment and service lines is the first for any part of Aloha. It is subject to bankruptcy court approval.

Saltchuk, which operates ocean and airfreight subsidiaries, said it was not interested in Aloha’s passenger business.

Saltchuk said it would retain as many Aloha cargo employees as possible.

Aloha spokesman Stu Glauberman said the airline will file a motion to have the bid considered.

“Aloha continues to entertain other bids for all or parts of our business,” he said. “Meanwhile Aloha is operating all of its business segments as usual and plans to continue to do so.”

Saltchuk has had a presence in Hawaii since 2000 when it acquired Young Brothers/Hawaiian Tug & Barge. In 2006, the company bought Hawaii Fuel Network, Maui Petroleum and Minit Stop Stores.

Saltchuk also owns Northern Air Cargo, the largest cargo carrier in Alaska, which uses the same type of aircraft as Aloha.

Its marine operations, based in Seattle, include Foss Maritime and Totem Ocean Trailer Express.

Saltchuk has nearly 6,000 employees, according to its Web site.

“We believe our knowledge of Hawaii, coupled with our extensive air-cargo operations experience, positions us well to help take Aloha Air Cargo to the next level,” Saltchuk President Tim Engle said in a statement.

Rocked by record fuel prices and a new low-fare competitor in Mesa Air Group’s go! airline, Aloha filed for Chapter 11 protection March 20, a little more than two years after emerging from bankruptcy.

A day later, the company put up for sale its passenger services, air-cargo and contract services, which include U.S. mail shipments.

Aloha, the second-largest Hawaii carrier, operates a fleet of 26 Boeing 737s to serve five airports statewide and six mainland U.S. destinations.