The New York company is the latest Internet retailer to put down physical roots in Seattle, another indication that the death of brick and mortar has been greatly exaggerated despite the difficulties faced by many traditional stores.

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Warby Parker, an online purveyor of hipster eyeglasses that Trotsky would have loved, is hanging its shingle on the same Fremont block as the statue of Lenin.

The New York company is the latest Internet retailer to put down physical roots in Seattle, another indication that the death of brick and mortar has been greatly exaggerated despite the difficulties faced by many traditional stores.

Retailers from haberdasher Bonobos — which opened in University Village this past summer — to bike-and-growler merchant MiiR have embraced physical storefronts as a way to further their brand and better connect with customers.

Warby Parker, a 5-year-old company, sells relatively cheap but good looking eyewear — and says it donates a pair of eyeglasses for every one purchased. It relies on shoppers ordering frames online, trying them out and returning the ones they don’t like. Buyers then input their prescription, and a few days later they receive their new eyeglasses in the mail.

The startup has been successful; a Wall Street Journal story earlier this year put its valuation at $1.2 billion after a $100 million funding round. That suggests there are a lot of frames traveling back and forth in mail vans.

But Warby Parker has long known that people also like to shop for eyewear in person. Soon after launching the startup while they attended the Wharton business school at University of Pennsylvania, the founders laid out frames on the living-room table of the apartment they shared, co-founder Dave Gilboa said in an interview. “We realized we were learning a ton from those face-to-face interactions.”

In their first office in New York, they reserved 200 square feet for a showroom. They also had a showroom bus that toured the country (and visited Seattle in 2013.) Warby Parker also had a pop-up store at Nordstrom in downtown Seattle and in Bellevue Square this past month.

The first so-called Warby Parker Annex opened in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District in late 2012. Seattle, which Gilboa said has always been “a strong market for us,” will be its 15th location. The recently raised $100 million is fueling the physical store expansion, and there will be more, in key cities, Gilboa said. But not too many more.

“We’re not going to be LensCrafters, with thousands of stores,” he said. “We expect e-commerce is still going to be the majority of our business for the foreseeable future.”

The Fremont location will open Saturday. Shoppers will be able to browse and try frames (which are out in the open, in shelves, and not behind a glass case) as well as pick up prescription eyewear ordered from the company.

They can also get their glasses adjusted and buy books from independent publishers.

Gilboa said the experience is more similar to that of an apparel retailer than that of a classic optical shop. Given that many of its more popular frames start at $95 (including single-vision prescription lenses) “people can think of them like they think about shoes” and have “multiple pairs,” Gilboa said.