Longtime local bedding manufacturer Pacific Coast Feather Company is sharply reducing its Seattle workforce and closing some factories elsewhere under its new owner.

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Longtime local bedding manufacturer Pacific Coast Feather Company is sharply reducing its Seattle workforce and closing some factories elsewhere under its new owner.

When Boca Raton-based Hollander Sleep Products bought Pacific Coast Feather in June, the companies said there were no immediate plans for layoffs or changes.

But a layoff of about 30 people — out of about 95 corporate employees — at Pacific Coast Feather’s Seattle headquarters took place later that month. Since then, a number of other employees have left on their own, said Mark Eichhorn, CEO of Hollander. That leaves about 45 people at the local office.

Eichhorn said in an interview last week he expects more people will exit “because there’s some uncertainty over how many positions will remain in Seattle,” and that there could be another round of layoffs before the end of the year or in 2018.

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Eichhorn anticipates there will eventually be about 25 people operating out of an office in Seattle, at a different location from its current home in Sodo, which was designed for a larger staff.

He said the June layoffs mostly involved cutting redundancies in the corporate office as Hollander absorbed Pacific Coast Feather, with jobs eliminated in areas such as sales, merchandising, and marketing, Eichhorn said.

A few customers have taken to Facebook to complain about difficulties reaching anyone in customer service following the acquisition.

According to Eichhorn, some of the staffing cuts had already been suggested by Pacific Coast Feather’s former CEO, Joe Crawford, who had reportedly been looking to reduce the staff size because sales had dipped in recent years. Crawford had said earlier that the company sold about $240 million of goods last year.

Crawford, who continued for a short time as president of Pacific Coast Feather under Eichhorn, is no longer with the company and could not be reached for comment. An outgoing message from his work phone says he retired July 31.

Hollander also plans to close two of Pacific Coast Feather’s seven plants in the fall.

One is a Pacific Coast Feather manufacturing facility in Des Plaines, Illinois, that processed down and feather and employs 30. The other is a factory in Gastonia, North Carolina, that manufactures mattress pads and employed 90 (though only about 45 people are left since the company announced in June the pending closure).

Eichhorn says he anticipates that the remaining five Pacific Coast Feather plants will operate at higher capacity since they will be taking on some of the Hollander manufacturing work.

Pacific Coast, which traces its roots in the business back 133 years to Germany and got its start as a company in Seattle about 50 years ago, is best known for its down and down-alternative bedding products and as a supplier to 4- and 5-star hotels worldwide.

It was sold to Hollander after the fourth generation of the founding Hanauer family, who were involved in other activities, thought it best to turn the company over to an owner who could give it the proper attention.

Hollander is known for producing large runs of lower-cost, high-quality synthetic bedding products.

Hollander intends to keep the Pacific Coast Feather brand — “we’re proud of that brand,” Eichhorn said — as well as the differentiation between the Hollander and Pacific Coast brands.