Wall Street rebounded Thursday, rising sharply as oil prices fell and investors took advantage of bargains in financial stocks after two...

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NEW YORK — Wall Street rebounded Thursday, rising sharply as oil prices fell and investors took advantage of bargains in financial stocks after two straight days of heavy declines.

The Dow Jones industrial index rose 82.97 to close at 11,615.93, after rising more than 180 points earlier. It lost a total of nearly 250 points on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Microsoft, one of the 30 Dow stocks, closed Thursday unchanged at $27.91. And Boeing, another Dow stock, gained 51 cents to $64.77.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose 7.10 to 1,292.93, and the Nasdaq composite index rose 25.05 to 2,453.67

Stocks initially fell after the Labor Department reported another hefty jump in consumer prices. The 0.8 percent overall rise in July’s Consumer Price Index was not as large as June’s increase, but it was twice as high as the market expected, and brings inflation to its highest annual pace in 17 years.

The market turned higher as investors began looking more positively at stock prices that were beaten down the past two sessions amid rising anxiety about credit losses at banks and brokerages.

“The greater fear right now is missing the next big rally,” said Richard Dickson, senior analyst at Lowry Research in Florida. “Inflation numbers were bad, but they are probably going to get better. The fact that the market has not sold off with any strength, investors are saying, ‘Hey, let’s go ahead and buy.’ “

Still, Wall Street has been highly volatile for months, and investors found it hard to hold to their enthusiasm; stocks came off their highs late in the day as some uncertainty about financials crept back into the market.

“[Investors] have different opinions as to what the value of those companies are given the tremendous difficulties they face,” said Kevin Dorwin, a principal with San Francisco-based Bingham, Osborn & Scarborough.

“There has been a sufficient amount of pessimism to warrant a short-term rally,” said Chris Johnson, chief executive and chief investment strategist at Johnson Research. “Money is on the sideline waiting to move in.”