After the Seattle Times story on "What women face at Microsoft and why many leave" was published online, Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer Brad Smith provided a statement on the company's efforts.

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After the Seattle Times story on “What women face at Microsoft and why many leave” was published online, Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer Brad Smith provided a statement on the company’s efforts. No on-the-record interviews or statements from the company were offered prior to publication, despite repeated requests over several months.

Here is Smith’s statement:

Under Satya Nadella’s leadership we are working extremely hard to change Microsoft’s culture, measure our progress, and compensate senior executives based on the progress they are making on diversity and inclusion.

We have a long road ahead of us, but over the past few years Microsoft has started to make real progress at increasing the representation of women at all levels, from college interns to corporate vice presidents. You can see this in the data points below:

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• Interns – 40.9 percent of all interns in 2017 were female. That’s up from 36.6 percent in 2016.

• University – Nearly 40 percent (39.3 percent, to be exact) of employees coming to Microsoft directly from colleges and universities in the past year are women. That’s a substantial increase from the 33.6 percent the year before.

• Midcareer hires – The percentage of women coming to Microsoft midcareer in the past year has increased by almost 13 points (26.2% to 29.6%).

• L65s and above – 18.8 percent of senior employees are now women. That reflects a steady 16-year improvement, as I understand your article now will note.

• Corporate vice presidents – Over the past three years, the number of female CVPs has increased by 95 percent (from 20 to 39) and the number of female CVPs in technical roles has more than doubled (from 7 to 16). Overall, female CVPs make up 19 percent of the CVP population and are continuing to increase.

We are committed to increasing diversity and inclusion as one of the fundamental goals for the company. One of the many steps we’ve taken more broadly is the development of non-traditional hiring sources that help us to invest in a stronger pipeline for Microsoft and for the industry as a whole.

There is more progress in front of us than behind us, but we believe that we have finally reached the point of generating some real momentum and substantive change.