VoloMetrix software presents analytics about how workers spend their day and the ways they collaborate with people inside and outside the company.

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Microsoft has agreed to buy VoloMetrix, a Seattle startup that makes software to analyze employee behavior.

The company didn’t disclose the terms of the deal, which is expected to close by the end of September.

VoloMetrix was founded in 2011 by Chris Brahm and Ryan Fuller, both management consultants with Bain & Co. The company raised about $17 million in venture capital, most recently with a $12 million haul announced last October and led by Split Rock Partners and Shasta Ventures.

The VoloMetrix team will be folded into Microsoft’s Office unit. Without providing specifics, a Microsoft spokeswoman said the company expects “a significant number” of VoloMetrix’s existing employees to ultimately make the move to Microsoft.

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Microsoft wouldn’t specify how many people VoloMetrix employs. On its website, VoloMetrix lists offices in Seattle and San Francisco, and about 40 people on corporate networking website LinkedIn say they work for the company.

VoloMetrix is the latest in a slate of smallstartups Microsoft has bought in the last year in a bid to improve its Office suite and data-analytics offerings.

The startup’s technology tracks employees’ use of email and other software, runs the data through its algorithms, and presents analytics about how workers spend their day and the ways they collaborate with people inside and outside the company.

VoloMetrix says its algorithms are designed to avoid scooping up non-work-related data, and in reports it defaults to group-related data on employees, not personally identifiable information.

VoloMetrix’s technology will be integrated into Delve, a program in Microsoft’s Office suite that helps businesses keep track of documents and analyze their organization.

In a blog post announcing the deal, Rajesh Jha, a Microsoft vice president who oversees Office development, said the data tools used by his group maintain strict privacy controls.