Pacific Northwest Microsoft said it fixed a glitch with the Windows Live identification program that shut users out of e-mail accounts and...

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Pacific Northwest

Microsoft

Microsoft said it fixed a glitch with the Windows Live identification program that shut users out of e-mail accounts and other online services Tuesday.

The failure prevented most customers worldwide from signing on, Microsoft said Tuesday afternoon in an e-mailed statement after fully restoring the service.

Windows Live ID gives users access to services such as Hotmail e-mail, the MSN Internet portal and Xbox Live video games with a single user name and password. The outage didn’t affect users that had already logged in, Microsoft said.

Microsoft

Lawsuit royalties to be reconsidered

A U.S. appeals court ordered a judge to reconsider how much Microsoft should pay a Guatemalan man in royalties for software that links databases and spreadsheets.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington ordered a trial judge to explain his reasoning for ordering Microsoft to pay 12 cents for every unit of its software installed on computers sold in the U.S.

Microsoft lost a jury verdict in the 2003 lawsuit and was told to pay $5.1 million to inventor Carlos Armando Amado.

Amado claimed Microsoft should pay $2 for every unit of software. Microsoft said it should pay no more than the 4-cent royalty rate established by the jury. U.S. District Judge David O. Carter in Los Angeles tripled the jury rate.

Nation / World

Visa

Record-size IPO set for March 19

Visa, the credit-card network planning the largest U.S. initial public offering, is planning to sell the shares March 19, according to Bloomberg data.

The company said Monday it plans to raise as much as $18 billion by selling 406 million Class A shares for $37 to $42 each.

Visa is trying to capitalize on the more than fivefold surge in the shares of smaller rival MasterCard since its May 2006 IPO. Banks have the option of selling an additional 40.6 million Visa shares, pushing the size of the deal to $18.8 billion.

Visa’s IPO would eclipse AT&T Wireless Group’s $10.6 billion stock offering in 2000.

Compiled from Bloomberg News