El Al Israel Airlines said Sunday it had agreed to buy four Boeing 777-200ER jets for delivery in 2012 and 2013. El Al has been carrying...

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El Al Israel Airlines said Sunday it had agreed to buy four Boeing 777-200ER jets for delivery in 2012 and 2013.

El Al has been carrying more passengers as tourism in Israel is set to reach a seven-year high this year.

El Al has an option to decide by the end of 2008 to convert to four 777-300ER jets instead.

Microsoft

Adobe’s software licensed for phones

Microsoft licensed Adobe’s software for viewing online videos and other files on cellphones, the companies said today.

Microsoft will distribute Flash Lite and Reader programs from Adobe Systems to cellphone makers who use Windows Mobile software.

Flash also allows users to interact with more Web sites.

Scott Rockfeld, group product manager at Microsoft’s mobile-communications business, said the move provides more choice to its customers.

Microsoft wouldn’t say what it is paying Adobe to license the software.

Microsoft has its own video-viewing software, Silverlight, considered a competitor that could slowly chip away at Flash’s market share.

Alitalia

Airline board OKs Air France-KLM bid

Alitalia’s board Sunday unanimously accepted Air France-KLM’s bid valued at $1.1 billion in a move to save the struggling carrier.

The offer values the airline at $216 million, far less than expected, based on a share swap of one Air France share for every 160 Alitalia shares. The Franco-Dutch carrier also said it would pay $946 million for convertible shares.

The Franco-Dutch carrier said it would inject $1.56 billion in capital once the deal is complete.

Air France-KLM wants the deal to be backed by unions, which have been critical of the planned 1,600 job cuts. The offer also must be approved by the Italian government, which is selling its 50 percent share, as well as stock market and EU competition regulators.

Alitalia will maintain its national identity.

Google

DoubleClick deal cost $3.24 billion

Google, owner of the world’s most-used Internet search engine, said the final cost of acquiring online-advertising company DoubleClick was $3.24 billion.

The amount includes the $3.11 billion in cash the companies agreed on in April, plus DoubleClick’s cash and the exercise price of outstanding options, Google said last week.

Compiled from Bloomberg News and The Associated Press