An AAR facility in Miami outfitted hundreds of Boeing-made jetliners during a period of several years with landing-gear equipment that had...

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CHICAGO — An AAR facility in Miami outfitted hundreds of Boeing-made jetliners during a period of several years with landing-gear equipment that had been painted in an “unapproved” fashion, according to a Federal Aviation Administration safety alert.

The repairs were made under service contracts that AAR has with various airlines.

AAR said in a statement that the maintenance the company has carried out complies with all regulations and is in line with standard industry practice.

The FAA said “MLG truck beams” used in aircraft landing gear “were not maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s maintenance manuals and in some cases violated an FAA airworthiness directive issued in 2001.

The March 25 “unapproved parts notification” from the FAA’s flight standards service said that in some cases overhauled truck beams had been sent back into service with a glossy enamel on certain surfaces. That paint is contrary to the maker’s maintenance manuals, the FAA said.

The FAA also said that AAR’s Miami facility had failed to document the application of the glossy enamel and approved trucks treated with that paint for a return to service, contrary to the maker’s maintenance manuals and an FAA directive issued in September 2001.

AAR said the directive the FAA refers to is in fact designed to prevent the painting over of a drain hole and isn’t applicable.

Boeing has approved the use of the enamel paint on the truck beams’ inner surface, AAR contends.

The FAA’s memo tells airlines to inspect their planes and take “appropriate action” if any of the allegedly improperly painted parts are found on their aircraft. It also recommends not installing any such parts that carriers have in their inventory.

The directive doesn’t oblige them to remove the parts or take any other specific action, however.