While Google said the data painted an incomplete picture of how people are paid, the salary details shared by employees are likely to heighten concerns over gender disparities in Silicon Valley.

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SAN FRANCISCO — Female employees are paid less than male staff members at most job levels within Google, and the pay disparity extends as women climb the corporate ladder, according to data compiled by workers that provide a snapshot of salary information at the internet giant.

A spreadsheet, obtained by The New York Times, contains salary and bonus information for 2017 that was shared by about 1,200 U.S. Google employees, or about 2 percent of the company’s global workforce.

While Google said the data painted an incomplete picture of how people are paid, the salary details shared by employees are likely to heighten concerns over gender gaps in Silicon Valley.

Long regarded as one of the world’s best workplaces because of its perks and generous compensation, Google is under examination by the Labor Department and has faced criticism from investors and some of its own employees over differences in how women and men are paid.

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“Silicon Valley has established itself as the boys’ club of the West, just like how Wall Street has established itself as the boys’ club of the East,” said Natasha Lamb, of Arjuna Capital, a wealth-management firm that takes activist positions on issues such as gender pay.

At a shareholder meeting for Alphabet, Google’s parent company, this year, Arjuna Capital put forward a proposal for the company to disclose what women make compared with their male peers.

Arjuna had persuaded seven of nine technology companies, including Apple, Amazon.com and Microsoft, to disclose that data. Alphabet’s directors urged shareholders to vote against the measure, and it failed.

Google said the spreadsheet’s information does not take into account a number of factors, like where employees are based, whether they are in higher-paying technical positions, and job performance.

Based upon its own analysis from January, Google said female employees make 99.7 cents for every dollar a man makes, accounting for factors like location, tenure, job role, level and performance.