The Washington state Supreme Court declined to reconsider its August ruling that the $15 minimum wage approved by city of SeaTac voters applies to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport as well.

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The Washington state Supreme Court has denied a request by Alaska Airlines and other groups to reconsider its August ruling that a $15 minimum-wage law passed by city of SeaTac voters applies to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport as well.

That means that thousands of hospitality and transportation workers at Sea-Tac Airport should soon see their minimum wage bumped up to $15.24 an hour, the current minimum in the city of SeaTac.

The court’s decision, issued Monday, “is effectively immediately,” said Lorrie Thompson, a spokeswoman for the state Supreme Court. “It’s up to the other jurisdictions and branches of government to do what they need to do” regarding the practicalities of implementing the law.

Mark Johnsen, senior assistant city attorney for the city of SeaTac, which is responsible for enforcing the law, said the decision “means they [employers] are going to have to start paying $15.24. We don’t anticipate there being a further appeal.”

Alaska Airlines, the Washington Restaurant Association, Filo Foods and BF Foods have not said whether they would appeal the decision further. They had filed the initial lawsuit challenging the city’s power to dictate pay at Sea-Tac Airport, which is owned and operated by the Port of Seattle.

“We believe there are unanswered questions in the Supreme Court’s decision,” Alaska Airlines said in a statement. “We are evaluating the options so that all parties have clarity going forward.”

The ruling is expected to affect some 4,700 people employed at Sea-Tac airport by contractors, concessionaires and car-rental agencies, accroding to proponents of the minimum-wage law.