The effort by state business groups to challenge I-1433, the state’s recently passed minimum wage and paid sick leave law. has come to an end.

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The effort by state business groups to challenge the state’s recently passed minimum wage and paid sick leave law has come to an end.

A coalition of business groups, including the National Federation of Independent Business, Washington Retail Association and Washington Farm Bureau, along with three local businesses, said Friday that it would not appeal a judge’s decision upholding Initiative 1433, passed by Washington voters last November.

The coalition had challenged I-1433 in court, saying among other things, that the initiative violates the state constitution by addressing more than one subject matter: both minimum wage and sick leave.

Earlier this month, Kittitas County Superior Court Judge Scott Sparks rejected that challenge, saying the plaintiffs had failed to establish that I-1433 violated the Washington State constitution, and ruling that I-1433 was about labor standards generally, which both minimum wage and paid sick leave fall under.

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Patrick Connor, Washington state director for the National Federation of Independent Business, said in a statement issued Friday that the judge’s decision was disappointing and that it would open the door to “political consulting sleight-of-hand.”

Nevertheless, the coalition decided not to spend money and time on an appeal, given that “we face long odds,” Connor said in a phone interview Friday.

He said it was doubtful the state Supreme Court would rule in their favor, given that the court had previously decided that a proposition approved in 2013 by SeaTac voters to raise the minimum wage and require paid sick leave did not violate the single-subject rule.

I-1433 raises the state’s minimum wage to $13.50 by 2020. The first pay jump occurred in January, raising the minimum wage from $9.47 to $11 an hour.

It also requires employers to allow workers to earn paid sick leave at the rate of one hour for every 40 hours worked, starting in 2018.