According to a study by the U.S. Small Business Association, only two-thirds of all small-business startups survive the first two years...

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NEW YORK — According to a study by the U.S. Small Business Association, only two-thirds of all small-business startups survive the first two years, and less than half make it to four years.

But before you let doubts quash your dream of starting your own business, take some time to examine them. They might turn out to be not true. From Scott Shane on Kiplinger.com, here are a couple of common myths of entrepreneurship:

It takes a lot of money to finance a new business. Not true. The typical startup requires only about $25,000 to get going. They borrow instead of paying for things. They rent instead of buy and pay people commissions intead of salaries.

Banks don’t lend money to startups. Government data show that banks account for 16 percent of all the financing provided to companies that are two years old or younger. That is three percentage points higher than the amount of money provided by the next highest source — trade creditors — and higher than friends and family, business angels, venture capitalists, strategic investors and government agencies.