LOS ANGELES — Walt Disney Co. pulled back the curtain on its highly anticipated streaming service Disney+, revealing key details about what content will be available on the app, including Disney classics and original shows and movies.

Disney’s new service, dubbed Disney+ will launch November 12 and cost $6.99 a month, said Kevin Mayer, head of Disney’s direct to consumer business on Thursday at a long-awaited investor day at the company’s Burbank headquarters.

Disney’s event day gave investors the first real glimpse into the company’s streaming strategy, which is fueled by a cadre of powerful franchises like Marvel, “Star Wars,” Pixar and “High School Musical. Wall Street and entertainment industry figures have been eager to learn more about Disney’s secretive plans.

The Disney+ app is an attempt to compete with Netflix and others in the streaming arena as audiences increasingly turn to online services for their entertainment. Disney+ is part of Chairman and Chief Executive Robert Iger’s broader strategy to adapt to changes in the media landscape, as people increasingly eschew traditional cable television packages and expect more films available in the home.

Mayer took audience through a virtual tour through its service, which is organized into five distinct brands that will have their own series and films on the app: Disney, Marvel, Pixar, Star Wars and former Fox property National Geographic. Disney’s content will be available for consumers to download onto their devices for offline use, Mayer said.

“We have worked extremely hard to make sure that our content shines through with an interface that is visually stunning,” Mayer said. “We have the brands that matter, which is the single biggest differentiator for our service.”

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Disney’s presentation took pains to showcase the company’s impressive array of popular brands that will be funneled into the service. Disney+ will be the permanent home of animated films, including classics such as “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” “Aladdin,” “The Little Mermaid” and “Bambi,” Pixar films, “Captain Marvel” and “Iron Man” are set to be available on the service, as is the “Star Wars” film saga. Also joining the app will be 250 hours of National Geographic content and a trove of Disney Channel programming.

Apple last month talked up its own programming slate at an event in Cupertino, featuring Hollywood heavyweights Steven Spielberg, Oprah Winfrey and Reese Witherspoon. That showcase largely fell flat in Hollywood because of a lack of specifics and footage. AT&T’s WarnerMedia, which owns “Game of Thrones” network HBO and film and TV studio Warner Bros., is also planning its own service for late this year.

During his remarks, Iger gave a shout out to the vision and creativity of the company’s founder, Walt Disney, and added that current corporate leaders were building on the legacy with the acquisition of the Fox assets and the push into digital distribution.

“Borrowing from one of Walt’s greatest strengths, it takes courage.” Iger said.

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