At the governor’s annual aerospace summit Thursday, the latest data on Washington state’s aerospace industry was released, showing a total economic impact last year of $94.7 billion supporting more than a quarter million jobs.

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At the governor’s annual aerospace summit Thursday, the latest data on Washington state’s aerospace industry was released, showing a total economic impact last year of $94.7 billion supporting more than a quarter million jobs.

The key findings:

• Almost one-fifth of all U.S. aerospace-manufacturing jobs are in this state, largely due to Boeing.

• The number of direct aerospace jobs in 2015, nearly 94,000, was essentially flat from the previous year.

• Aerospace workers earned average annual pay of $107,000 — twice the state average of $54,000.

• 27,000 additional employees worked in aerospace-related jobs, such as carbon-fiber manufacturing.

The figure of 131,000 other jobs attributed to the industry’s impact is an estimate supported by the consumer spending of the highly paid aerospace workers as they purchase everything from groceries to cars.

• However, the estimated 252,800 total jobs generated by the industry — adding together direct jobs, those in related industries and those induced by the spending of aerospace workers — was down more than 14,000 from the year before.

Spencer Cohen, senior economist at Seattle-based economic-development consulting firm Community Attributes, who compiled the data, said the jobs figure for 2014 was skewed upward by Boeing’s payment of a $10,000 contract bonus to its nearly 31,000 Machinists. The consumer spending from those extra wages flowed through the economy and added many more induced jobs in unrelated businesses than usual, Cohen said.

Aside from that atypical impact, the data show aerospace here in a steady state during 2015.

Though Boeing shed some 1,500 jobs last year, other aerospace companies added workers here, including Boeing suppliers moving here for 777X work and the burgeoning space technology sector.

At the conference in Lynn­wood, Mitsubishi Aircraft, which just delivered its first MRJ regional jet for flight tests in Moses Lake and will eventually employ some 400 people between there and Seattle, was named “aerospace company of the year.”

Gov. Jay Inslee said he’s “never been more confident in the state of aerospace.”

Conference attendees also heard a pitch from Vik Kachoria, chief executive of Boston-based Spike Aerospace, promoting his plan to develop a small supersonic jet.

Kachoria said the company is looking at seven states, one of which is Washington, for possible location of a final assembly plant.

Although the 18-passenger airplane exists now only as a concept, Kachoria said Spike intends to build a smaller scale four-seater demonstrator that will fly by 2019 — a timeline that many greeted with skepticism.