Amazon now owns Whole Foods — and the online retailer is slashing prices at its new chain of grocery stores.

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Amazon promised Thursday that the same day its purchase of Whole Foods was sealed, it would cut prices at its newly acquired high-end grocery stores across the country.

Sure enough, as Whole Foods shoppers entered the store Monday morning, prices had been slashed on many popular items.

Whole Trade Bananas, Fuji and Gala apples, ground beef and eggs were just a few of the things with lower prices Monday morning at the South Lake Union store in Seattle.

Here are some more items:

Whole Foods’ store-brand eggs went from $3.79 to $2.99 a dozen.

Large brown grade A eggs in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and Monday (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)
Large brown grade A eggs in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and Monday (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)

Store-brand butter dropped 50 cents.

Organic salted butter in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and Monday (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)
Organic salted butter in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and Monday (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)

Organic bananas dropped 30 cents per pound.

Organic yellow bananas in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Aug. 25, left, and on Aug. 28, right,  after the merger with Amazon. (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)
Organic yellow bananas in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Aug. 25, left, and on Aug. 28, right, after the merger with Amazon. (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)

Gala (pictured) and Fuji apples were $1 cheaper per pound Monday morning.

Gala apples  in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and Monday (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)
Gala apples in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and Monday (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)

Grass-fed ground beef dropped from $9.99 a pound, according to Times photos Friday morning, to $6.99 Monday morning.

Grass-fed organic ground beef in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and the label on Monday morning before the meat was put out for the day (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)
Grass-fed organic ground beef in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and the label on Monday morning before the meat was put out for the day (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)

Farmed Atlantic salmon dropped $3 a pound over the weekend.

Farmed Atlantic salmon in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and Monday (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)
Farmed Atlantic salmon in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and Monday (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)

Whole chickens dropped by $1 per pound.

Whole chicken in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and Monday (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)
Whole chicken in the South Lake Union Whole Foods on Friday (left), and Monday (right). (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)

And Whole Foods’ store-brand almond butter dropped from $7.99 to $6.99.

Almond butter on Friday (left), and Monday (right) in the South Lake Union Whole Foods. (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)
Almond butter on Friday (left), and Monday (right) in the South Lake Union Whole Foods. (Scott Greenstone / The Seattle Times)

In addition to these, the store cut the prices of Hass avocados by $1.50 each, New York strip steak by $1 per pound and Cheerios by $1, among other items.

Shoppers Kate Gomberg and Rick Boretsky, of Vancouver, B.C., don’t frequently go to Whole Foods, but as they sat outside the South Lake Union location Monday morning, they said that might change.

“It’s a bit weird for older people like ourselves, corporations buying and taking over different elements of commerce,” Boretsky said.

But it seems like a good thing, Gomberg said, if the prices are coming down.

Boretsky and Gomberg don’t shop online, so their experience was different from that of Erik Swanson, an employee at the Center for Infectious Disease Research two blocks down from Whole Foods, who stopped by to shop Monday morning.

Swanson has also bought food on AmazonFresh, Amazon’s grocery-delivery service.

“We’re just surrounded by so much Amazon here,” Swanson said.

Editor’s note: Photos in a side-by-side comparison on a previous version of this story incorrectly compared different types of bananas at Whole Foods.