As the search process rolls on in relative silence, some of the retailer’s suitors have jumped in with advertising campaigns to try to sway Amazon decision-makers.

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Since accepting 238 proposals to host its second headquarters, Amazon has revealed very little about its search for a second home.

Employees are said to be compiling data ranking each of the contenders on the range of factors the company is seeking for HQ2: an educated labor force, availability of housing, ease of transit, and how much each municipality is offering Amazon from their own coffers.

Amazon has said it plans to decide where to locate its second headquarters campus sometime next year.

As the search process rolls on in relative silence, some of the retailer’s suitors have jumped in with advertising campaigns to try to sway Amazon decision-makers.

Buses have been popular targets.

Philadelphia took to the side of King County Metro buses with variations of its brotherly love slogan (“City of Foodie Love,” “City of Rooftop Love,” etc.). North Carolina state agencies also went after Amazonian commuters, touting the inventions to come out of the state (bar codes are among them, apparently).

Some opted for a more digital route.

Economic development boosters from Sacramento are spending $150,000 on a social media ad campaign targeting Amazon employees, so when they scroll through Facebook, say, they are greeted by testimonials about the bicycle friendly environment and other perks found in California’s capitol city.

The Atlanta suburb of Stonecrest, Georgia, on Wednesday announced a digital ad campaign of its own.

During a blitz of HQ2 publicity stunts earlier this year, the city stood out by offering to de-annex 345 acres of land and hand it over to Amazon cost free (with the option of making Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos the mayor of this new city). The abdication of the principle of governance by the people in exchange for Amazon’s HQ2 presence was one of the most prominent in a string of offers to give up traditional tenets of democracy, like the power to collect taxes or decide collectively on spending priorities.

Not wanting to be forgotten, Stonecrest said this week that “Bezos, his corporate team and Amazon employees will get ads on their smartphones and other devices” reminding them of the city’s offer.

Stonecrest’s news release didn’t say exactly how they planned to target the phone of the world’s richest man.