At a news conference at Amazon’s headquarters, Small Business Administrator Linda McMahon praised the company — which has made a big business out of letting independent merchants sell on its website — as an enabler of entrepreneurship.

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President Donald Trump hasn’t had the friendliest things to say about Amazon.com, the company founded by Washington Post owner Jeff Bezos. At one point during the presidential campaign, Trump said Amazon had a “huge antitrust problem.”

At least one other member of the administration, however, seems to hold Amazon in high regard.

Linda McMahon, head of the U.S. Small Business Administration, on Wednesday visited the e-commerce giant’s headquarters in Seattle. At a news conference, McMahon praised the company — which has made a big business out of letting independent merchants sell on its website — as being an enabler of entrepreneurship.

“It’s exciting to see all the things that Amazon is doing,” said administrator McMahon, who co-founded WWE, a wrestling and entertainment empire.

When asked about her boss’ previously hostile stance toward Amazon, McMahon said that from her perch, she saw that the company had provided ample “opportunities for small businesses,” giving them the means to sell and distribute their goods. “You can see in some of the data already that’s been very positive.”

McMahon was meeting with Peter Faricy, vice president of Amazon Marketplace, the platform that enables third-party merchants to sell their wares on the e-commerce giant’s site. The business has grown to become one of Amazon’s so-called “pillars”— a multibillion dollar enterprise that now accounts for half of the goods sold on Amazon.com. Amazon also handles logistics for many of these merchants.

McMahon and Faricy met with various small businesses who operate on Amazon, including Spencer Lindsay, a security guard who works on Amazon’s campus and sells barbecue sauce online.

Kristin Rae, who runs Inspire International, a travel luggage business, out of her home in Normal, Illinois, said that “the ability to sit down with the administrator was huge,” especially for tiny businesses like hers.