CHICAGO (AP) — A managing editor and the publisher and editor-in-chief are leaving the Chicago Tribune, joining a growing number of journalists who have departed since a hedge fund with a reputation for dramatically cutting costs and eliminating jobs became Tribune Publishing’s largest shareholder.

The Chicago Tribune reported on Thursday that Bruce Dold, who has served as publisher and editor-in-chief since 2016, will on April 30 leave the paper after 42 years. The 64-year-old Dold, who won a Pulitzer for editorial writing in 1994, will be succeeded as editor-in-chief by Colin McMahon, Tribune Publishing’s chief content officer.

Also leaving in the leadership shuffle is managing editor Peter Kendall. The 60-year-old joined the paper as an intern 32 years ago and is leaving his post effective Friday. According to the paper, his position will not be filled. One managing editor will remain.

Several reporters and editors from Tribune Publishing’s chain of newspapers took voluntary buyouts earlier this month in a cost-cutting program. The paper also announced that Tim Knight, Tribune Publishing CEO, was stepping down in a shake-up of its leadership ranks. He was succeeded by CFO Terry Jimenez.

Alden Global Capital took a 32% stake in Tribune Publishing in November. Alden has been purchasing newspapers across the United States, selling off their assets and drastically cutting their editorial staffs.

Besides the Tribune, Tribune Publishing owns a host of newspapers across the country, including the Baltimore Sun, Hartford Courant, the New York Daily News, and The Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk, Virginia.