Michael Lee, left, is living at the now-closed Red Lion hotel in Renton, where the Downtown Emergency Service Center, a Seattle nonprofit, is housing more than 200 homeless people. For the residents, reports of fights, overdoses, violence and threats are reportedly down. But some cities hosting these shelter populations are growing impatient. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)
Michael Lee, left, is living at the now-closed Red Lion hotel in Renton, where the Downtown Emergency Service Center, a Seattle nonprofit, is housing more than 200 homeless people. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)
Project Homeless

At hotels for homeless Seattleites, fear and frustration outside but comparative calm within

King County has paid to move homeless people into hotels during the coronavirus pandemic. For at least one of the hotels, the emergency move appears to have demonstrated the benefits of an approach that houses people before asking them to get an income or agree to change their behavior.

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