Descendants gather at the gravestone of Takuji and Ito Yamashita in the Yamashitas’ hometown of Yawatahama, Japan. The couple moved back to Japan in 1957, after their daughter Martha’s death from tuberculosis. Takuji died soon after at the age of 84, and Ito passed away in 1969, aged 88. The cross expresses the Yamashitas’ lifelong Christian faith. (Steven Goldsmith / Special to The Seattle Times, 2003)
Descendants gather at the gravestone of Takuji and Ito Yamashita in the Yamashitas’ hometown of Yawatahama, Japan. (Steven Goldsmith / Special to The Seattle Times, 2003)
Pacific NW Magazine

How a Japanese immigrant stood up to the injustices of his day with a pioneering civil rights message that resonates in ours

Takuji Yamashita, a 1902 University of Washington Law School graduate, voiced with rare clarity why America must improve — to live up to its own founding principles. His writings and speeches belong in U.S. history texts, beacons to the future as well as the past. VIEW

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