Aerial view of the Ice Harbor Dam near Pasco, looking east up the Snake River. Temperatures always have spiked in the Snake and Columbia at times in summer, even before the dams. But today, the effects of the dams combined with the cumulative effects of climate change push temperatures in the rivers over the state maximum temperature of 68 degrees for weeks on end, the EPA found. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)
Aerial view of the Ice Harbor Dam near Pasco, looking east up the Snake River. Temperatures always have spiked in the Snake and Columbia at times in summer, even before the dams. But today, the effects of the dams combined with the cumulative effects of climate change push temperatures in the rivers over the state maximum temperature of 68 degrees for weeks on end, the EPA found. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)
Environment

Washington state aims to regulate water temperature at federal dams, wading into controversy

Hot water kills salmon, which orcas need to survive. Even small temperature increases in rivers threaten both species.  VIEW

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