Sam Wasser watches as thousands of tusks go up in flames in April 2016 in Kenya. In the largest such burn ever, the country destroyed more than 100 tons of confiscated ivory. Wasser and his team sampled some of the ivory for DNA testing, which can reveal where the elephants were killed and trace the routes traffickers use to move ivory from Africa to markets in Asia. (Kate Brooks)
Pacific NW Magazine

Sam Wasser pours his intense passion for protecting wildlife into research and catching poachers

University of Washington conservation biologist Sam Wasser, driven to the point of exhaustion, is serious about his pioneering research and his search for bad guys.  VIEW

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