Of the Seahawks’ regular starting lineup last season, four players were not invited to the NFL combine — receiver Doug Baldwin, offensive linemen Garry Gilliam and Patrick Lewis and cornerback Jeremy Lane.

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Three-hundred thirty-two players will take part in the NFL combine this week in Indianapolis.

Two-hundred fifty-six players will be taken in the NFL draft on April 28-30.

Not every player at the combine gets drafted, and not every player who is drafted attends the combine, as the Seahawks’ roster makes clear.

Of the Seahawks’ regular starting lineup last season, four players were not invited to the NFL combine — receiver Doug Baldwin, offensive linemen Garry Gilliam and Patrick Lewis and cornerback Jeremy Lane.

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Another key player, tight end Luke Willson, also was not invited. And former Seahawks linebacker Malcolm Smith, the Super Bowl XLVIII MVP, was not invited.

Baldwin, Gilliam and Lewis were undrafted, and Lane (sixth round in 2012) and Willson (fifth round in 2013) were third-day selections.

Baldwin set a franchise record last season for touchdown receptions with 14. Two years ago, in a freelance story published in The Seattle Times written by Ryan Gamon, Baldwin made it clear he thinks the combine is meaningless.

“Honestly, I think the combine is a waste of time,’’ he said then in an email. “The effort should be in film watching, physicals and mental evaluations. If you can play football, you can play football. Measurables at the combine don’t change that.”

Some observers have claimed that one of the big benefits of the combine is the exhaustive physical exams given to every player. Having standardized physical information on every player roughly two months before the draft, in fact, might be as valuable as anything that happens at the combine.

Also perhaps as important as the 40-yard-dash times are the 15-minute interviews teams can conduct with players. Teams often will meet with players for longer periods in other settings, but the combine allows teams to meet with lower-rated players and potentially kickstart a relationship that proves fruitful down the road.

For all the media coverage the combine gets, though, it remains just one aspect of a team’s predraft evaluation of players.

Teams already have heavily scouted most players either via film or campus visits made last fall (recall the emphasis the Seahawks later placed on John Schneider’s visit to Michigan the previous November in its decision to draft defensive end Frank Clark).

And following the combine, teams will send scouts across the country to college pro days.

Often, players who perform well at the combine sit out pro days other than to meet with coaches and team officials, allowing those who don’t go to the combine their chance to shine.

Willson, for instance, ran a 4.57 40 at Rice’s pro day in 2013, which would have ranked second among tight ends at the combine. The time helped compel the Seahawks to draft him despite the fact he had just nine catches his senior season.

“Not everybody knew about him,” Carroll said that year of Willson. “He hadn’t done a whole lot, but we saw the talent. We saw the range of ability, but it was really John Schneider’s knack of understanding where he would get drafted that made him so valuable to us.”

Middle linebacker Bobby Wagner, meanwhile, fell into a separate category in 2012. He was invited to the combine but did not participate because of pneumonia.

Wagner later turned in a vertical leap of 39.5 inches and ran a 4.45 40 at the Utah State pro day, further enhancing the view of those watching that he could be a mid-second-round pick.

The Seahawks then made sure to get him ahead of another player they had on their radar — quarterback Russell Wilson — taking Wagner at No. 47 overall and waiting to select Wilson a round later at No. 75.