ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — Denver Broncos leading tackler Danny Trevathan is out six to eight weeks after fracturing his left knee during a particularly intense padded practice Tuesday.

The Broncos said their weakside linebacker has what’s called a medial tibial impaction fracture but, fortunately, no torn ligaments.

Trevathan, who didn’t put any weight on his left leg after being carted off the field during team drills, is expected to return to the Broncos right around their bye week in late September, meaning he would only miss three regular-season games, at most.

He was hurt on an 11-on-11 run play in which center Will Montgomery rolled over him.

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Trevathan, a sixth-round draft choice out of Kentucky in 2012, is coming off a breakout season in which he led the Broncos with 124 tackles and picked off three passes before leading the team with two dozen tackles in the playoffs.

“You just hate it,” Peyton Manning said while Trevathan was being examined by the team’s medical staff. “You hate it in a game when you see that. And you hate it out here in practice. So, our prayers are with Danny. We’re praying for positive results and hopefully he’s OK. He’s an important part of our football team.”


• For Brady Quinn, this was a long time coming.

On the eve of the 2007 NFL draft, Quinn said he was told by “a very, very good source” that he would be taken by the Miami Dolphins — who then, somewhat famously, passed on him and chose Ted Ginn Jr. with their first-round selection, a move that drew immediate jeers from fans at the team’s draft party.

There was no jeering Tuesday.

Quinn completed his signing with the Dolphins in the morning, then hit the practice field with his new club for the first time and started what basically becomes a competition with Matt Moore to become Miami’s backup quarterback behind starter Ryan Tannehill this season.

“To be honest with you, I thought I was going to Miami,” Quinn said of his draft-day experience, which eventually saw him land with Cleveland, 13 picks after Miami went with Ginn. “It’s kind of crazy to think almost eight years later now, I finally made it here.”

Ajit Pai called the NFL’s television blackout rules “outdated,” and urged his fellow Federal Communications Commission representatives to vote in favor of having them repealed to address fan concerns.

“Right now, the FCC is officially on the side of blackouts. We should be on the side of sports fans,” Pai said during a news conference in Buffalo. “The FCC shouldn’t get involved in handing out special favors or picking winners and losers. And in my view, there is no reason for the FCC to be involved in the sports blackout business.”

Pai, one of five FCC commissioners, became the first to speak out in favor of eliminating the NFL policy the FCC instituted in 1975. The regulation prevents games that are not sold out 72 hours in advance of kickoff from being broadcast in the home team’s market by cable and satellite providers.

• Dallas cornerback Orlando Scandrick blamed his positive drug test that led to a four-game suspension for violating the NFL’s policy on performance-enhancing drugs on a recreational drug he took in Mexico that he didn’t know contained an amphetamine. Scandrick took the blame for the error and apologized to his family, teammates and organization for the mistake that will force him to miss the first month of the season.

• Cleveland Browns coach Mike Pettine said he expects Brian Hoyer and Johnny Manziel to get equal reps with the first-team offense on Monday against Washington.

The Browns also signed unrestricted free-agent quarterback Rex Grossman and waived quarterback Tyler Thigpen. The 33-year-old Grossman is entering his 12th year in the NFL.