Bert Clark, who was head football coach at Washington State from 1964 to 1967, died this week in Katy, Texas. He was 74. Clark's best Cougars team was the 1965 "Cardiac Kids,"...

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Bert Clark, who was head football coach at Washington State from 1964 to 1967, died this week in Katy, Texas. He was 74.


Clark’s best Cougars team was the 1965 “Cardiac Kids,” who defeated three Big Ten teams — Iowa, Minnesota and Indiana — on the road and finished 7-3.


Clark’s record at WSU was 15-24-1. He was 1-3 against Washington.


Clark went to Pullman after serving on Jim Owens’ Washington staff from 1957 to 1963. He and Owens had been teammates on Oklahoma teams coached by Bud Wilkinson.


Clark grew up in Wichita Falls, Texas. He was a star linebacker and also played center for the Sooners, and he was a member of the 1950 national-championship team. He played one year in the Canadian Football League with Calgary. After two years in the Army, he joined the coaching staff at Arkansas, then reunited with Owens in Seattle.


After leaving the Palouse, Clark spent one year as an assistant at New Mexico and one year as an assistant with the CFL’s Winnipeg Blue Bombers before returning to Texas and becoming a stock broker.


Former WSU coach Mike Price was a member of Cougars teams coached by Clark. In a statement released by WSU yesterday, Price said, “Bert taught me the toughness I needed at that time in my life. I appreciate the experience of playing for him probably more now than then.”


Clark, who was divorced, is survived by a son and a daughter. A graveside service is set for today in Wichita Falls.




Notes


• The Cougars reportedly have a commitment from Dwight Tardy, a top California running back from St. Paul High School in Santa Fe Springs.


Tardy, 5-foot-11 and 202 pounds, reportedly ran for 2,272 yards on 236 carries and scored 36 touchdowns last season.


Harry Missildine, best known as former sports editor and columnist for The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, is recovering from a recent stroke.


Missildine, 84, suffered the stroke at his Moscow, Idaho, home on Dec. 1. Though semi-retired for years, Missildine has continued to write columns for the Moscow-Pullman Daily News.


Missildine, a member of the Inland Northwest Sports Hall of Fame, is undergoing physical therapy for some paralysis on his left side. He is accepting visitors at St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute, 711 South Cowley, Spokane, WA 99202.


Craig Smith: 206-464-8279 or csmith@seattletimes.com