The bowl season has arrived and fans can expect two things: lots of games and lots of points. Nineteen of the 28 bowl games are scheduled from tomorrow through New Year's Eve. Many of the matchups seem...

Share story

The bowl season has arrived and fans can expect two things: lots of games and lots of points.

Nineteen of the 28 bowl games are scheduled from tomorrow through New Year’s Eve. Many of the matchups seem mundane, or odd. Memphis against Bowling Green? Toledo vs. Connecticut?

But don’t be fooled. Often the pre-New Year’s Day bowls provide some of the best viewing.

Check out some of these scores from last year’s second-tier bowl games: Hawaii 54, Houston 48; California 52, Virginia Tech 49; Miami (Ohio) 49, Louisville 28; Minnesota 31, Oregon 30.

Most Read Stories

Unlimited Digital Access. $1 for 4 weeks.

There are a few potential shootouts this year, too — starting Wednesday with Memphis vs. Bowling Green in the GMAC Bowl in Mobile, Ala.

The Falcons are among a record five Mid-American Conference teams in the postseason and rank fourth in the nation in scoring at 43.6 points per game. Memphis, making its second straight bowl appearance after a 32-year drought, averages more than 35 points.

The Hawaii Bowl on Friday in Honolulu could also be a fun one, with the hometown Warriors facing Alabama-Birmingham.

Timmy Chang, who holds the NCAA career record for yards passing, and receiver Chad Owens, a second-team All-American, put up plenty of points and yards for Hawaii. And the Warriors’ defense usually allows the same.

Texas Tech’s offense will try to keep up with a surly and talented California team in the Dec. 30 Holiday Bowl in San Diego, but for pure entertainment the Liberty Bowl on Dec. 31 in Memphis, Tenn., might be the best show.

No. 7 Louisville is No. 1 in scoring, averaging 50.3 points. No. 10 Boise State ranks second in that category, at 49.7.


Jenkins discusses ouster of Willingham


Rev. John I. Jenkins, the incoming president of Notre Dame, has provided both an explanation and a defense of his part in the school’s decision to dismiss Fighting Irish coach Tyrone Willingham last month.

Willingham was introduced as Washington’s coach last Monday.

In remarks last week to the Faculty Board on Athletics, Jenkins confirmed he had called the meeting that led to Notre Dame firing Willingham. But Jenkins rebutted the notion he had done so at the urging of Patrick McCartan, chairman of the board of trustees.

Jenkins made it a point to say he had initiated the contact with McCartan, not the other way around. “It has been said there was inappropriate trustee involvement in this decision,” Jenkins said. “I was not pressured into any action I took.”

Jenkins said he had acted because of an agreement with the outgoing school president, Rev. Edward A. Malloy, allowing Jenkins to take the lead on any decisions that would extend into his tenure.