SAN ANTONIO – If the NBA Finals had resumed Friday, there was no way LeBron James could have played.

But Game 2 is Sunday — and four-time league MVP James plans to be ready.

With his gait still affected by severe cramping and dehydration, and feeling the effects of a sleepless night brought on by several trips to the bathroom — an unavoidable drawback of having his body filled with fluids — James insisted he will play.

“I’ll be in uniform on Sunday,” James said Friday. “I should be 100 percent on Sunday. Obviously I’m going to take it light today. Training staff said I should take it light today. Give the body another day to recover. Tomorrow I should be back on my feet full go — and I got all day Sunday to get ready for Sunday night.”

When James was there in a sweltering Game 1 on Thursday, the Heat was right there as well. When he was done, so was the Heat.

San Antonio’s lead was 94-92 after James scored with 4:09 left; he was out of the game for good and unable to move 10 seconds later. From that point, the Spurs went on a 16-3 run.

Miami coach Erik Spoelstra called the situation Crampgate.

Among developments:

• Spoelstra revealed James took seven anti-cramping pills during the game.

• The air conditioning was working again at AT&T Center, and league officials said a faulty breaker caused the breakdown during Game 1.

• Gatorade officials issued an apology over tweets that made light of James’ cramps. James is an endorser of Powerade, a rival sports drink.

Note

Donald Sterling hasn’t signed off on the official sale of the Los Angeles Clippers because he hopes the league will rescind a $2.5 million fine and lifetime ban from all league activities for making racist remarks, according to sources.

Sterling recently saw a draft of a statement from the league he thought absolved him of the penalties, but a person familiar with the NBA’s position said the statement, which was not released to the public, offered no such relief.

New Clippers owner-designate Steve Ballmer continues to await an official sign-off from Sterling, whose wife, Shelly, negotiated the NBA-record $2 billion sale of the franchise last week to the former Microsoft CEO.