Christian Jones doesn’t command the ball, and he certainly isn’t a player that opponents scout against. Jones is the player who does the little things well. And he was invaluable in that role for the Eagles on Saturday, as they beat Kentwood 66-54 to win the Class 4A state title.

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Federal Way has a bona fide star in Jalen McDaniels. It has a tremendous shooter in Ferron Flavors. Marcus Stephens and D’Jimon Jones can score in a hurry, also.

Christian Jones doesn’t command the ball, and he certainly isn’t a player that opponents scout against. Jones is the player who does the little things well. And he was invaluable in that role for the Eagles on Saturday, as they beat Kentwood 66-54 to win the Class 4A state title.

“He’s a horse,” Federal Way coach Jerome Collins said. “He’s a guy that if you looked in the box score, you don’t know he’s there. If you watch the game, if you’re at the game, you understand his value. He’s a guy that pushes the board offensively, defensively … always constantly talking to the team. He’s a consummate captain.”

One of the glaring needs of the Eagles throughout the game was offensive help. In an ugly first half, the 6-foot-3 senior who will play baseball at the University of Washington in the fall, was the one constant for Federal Way, which went into the break down 29-25.

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The offense was in need of a boost because of McDaniels’ woeful start. McDaniels, who is committed to play at San Diego State and led Federal Way at 19 points per game, didn’t make a field goal in the first half and sat for a long portion due to foul troubles. Jones stepped up with eight points and five rebounds before intermission.

“He does everything — gets rebounds, putbacks, plays great defense, always [energetic], always bringing us together when we know we got to make a run,” McDaniels said of Jones. “It’s always good to have him on our team.”

The senior was equally effective in the second half and finished with 18 points and 12 rebounds, including five offensive.

“He’s a heck of a player, he goes for the rebound extremely hard,” Kentwood coach Blake Solomon said. “When they did miss their threes, Christian was there to clean it up. If we could have got a body (on him), I think we would’ve been all right.”

That’s what makes Jones so important: the Eagles don’t have to call a play for him to make an impact. Much of his offensive impact comes from either him creating for himself or scoring on a putback. It’s not an issue of finding shots or trying to get Jones in a rhythm, as it is for many players.

“To do all the dirty work,” Jones said of his role. “Rebound, defend, pick my spots and when I get it, finish it and play defense.

“That’s my personality, I don’t want all the stardom. This is new to me. At the end of the day, I just want to win at the end of the day.”

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